The Friday Mash (Black Sox Edition)

On this day in 1919, the Cincinnati Reds defeated the Chicago White Sox 5 games to 3, in the World Series. Eight members of the White Sox were later accused of intentionally losing games in exchange for taking bribes from gamblers. All eight were banned for life.

And now….The Mash! 

We begin in Boston, where an Israeli company’s water purification technology is converting the Charles River’s famous “dirty water” into a new pale ale by Harpoon Brewing Company.

Some establishments are trying to cut costs by replacing bartenders with self-serve taps. However, human beings are still needed to check IDs and make sure intoxicated patrons don’t get served.

Anheuser-Busch has invented the Bud Light “Bud-e Fridge”. This wi-fi-enabled appliance will provide your mobile phone with real-time updates on your beer supply.

In an effort to attract moms in their 20s and 30s, Chuck E. Cheese is adding beer and wine to the beverage menu. The chain is also offering thin-crust and gluten-free pizza.

Raleigh television station WRAL interviewed Rodenbach Brewery’s Rudi Ghequire, the “father of sour beer”, about the style’s growing popularity in the U.S.

Authorities in Casablanca have canceled a beer festival because it violated local laws and customs. Morocco is a Muslim country, but tourists and non-Muslims are allowed to drink.

Finally, the Straight to Ale brewery in Huntsville, Alabama, honors the city’s NASA heritage with a “space beers” series. Its ales have honored the International Space Station, Laika the Soviet space dog, and even unobtanium from the movie Avatar.

No comments

“Ask Your Doctor if Beer is Right for You”

Most news stories about beer and health emphasize how unhealthy beer is. But for most of human history, that wasn’t the case. In fact, our ancestors used beer as medicine. Patrick McGovern of the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology found that before modern medications were developed, the sick were treated with beer and alcohol-containing herbal cocktails. He points out that alcohol relieves pain, stops infection, and kills bacteria and parasites in contaminated water. Alcohol also helps the digestive system break down food.

McGovern has found ancient texts that describe therapeutic cocktails. Prescriptions in ancient China and Egypt medical papyri called for wine or beer as a “dispensing agent,” with a varying mixture of herbs depending on the patient’s ailment. In addition to dissolving the herbs, alcohol made the mixture more palatable. Then, as in Mary Poppins, a spoonful of sugar helped the medicine go down.

Whether these ancient remedies actually worked is still up for debate. However, the bark of certain trees has yielded the key ingredients in aspirin, the anti-malarial drug quinine, and the cancer drug Taxol. And scientists are investigating substances in modern-day beer that might be valuable sources of medicines.

No comments

The Friday Mash (Peanuts Edition)

Sixty-five years ago today, the Peanuts comic strip, written and illustrated by Charles Schulz, was first published. Peanuts became one of the most popular and influential comic strips in history.

And now….The Mash! 

We begin in Philadelphia, the final stop of Pope Francis’s American visit. Local writer Don Russell, aka “Joe Sixpack,” takes a tongue-in-cheek look at the history of papal influence on brewing.

Israel now has 32 craft breweries. One of them, located in the hills of Galilee, uses chickpeas and dates in its recipe for a gluten-free beer.

Eastern Michigan University can’t win for losing. It latest effort to draw fans for its struggling football team—beer sales—resulted in a $3,000 loss. And yes, EMU lost the game.

After “some extensive field research,” Brent Nunn of the Dallas Observer has compiled a list of ten dumb things light beer drinkers say about craft beer.

Samuel Adams announced that it will introduce a series of nitro-conditioned beers early next year. The first three nitro offerings will be a white ale, an IPA, and a coffee stout.

Two Belgian scientists are making lager beers more diverse by cross-breeding yeasts. The new strains not only ferment more quickly than commercial strains, but are delicious as well.

Finally, blame global warming for pumpkin beers showing up on shelves before Labor Day. For example, persistently hot weather forced Rogue Ales to harvest its pumpkins weeks earlier than last year.

No comments

Dogfish Head Does Deal With Private Equity Firm

On Monday, Sam Calagione, the CEO of Dogfish Head Craft Brewery, Inc., told his employees that LNK Partners, a New York-based private equity firm, has taken a 15-percent stake in the brewery. As part of the deal, LNK would be given one seat on the company’s board of directors.

Calagione made it clear that Dogfish Head will remain a family-led and -controlled business. He also said that LNK was in accord with his instance that the deal wouldn’t lead to an initial public offering, interfere with the brewery’s “off-centered” culture, or stress fast growth over “smart growth”.

Dogfish Head, the nation’s 13th largest craft brewery, produces 175,000 barrels a year.

No comments

How the GABF Came to Be

Last night, the 34th Great American Beer Festival came to an end. There wouldn’t have been a 34th GABF, or even a first one, had it not been for Charlie Papazian—and, perhaps, an event called “Beer and Steer”.

Beer and Steer, organized during the 1970s by Papazian, was annual beer party, held in the foothills above Boulder, Colorado. Homebrewers and beer enthusiasts gathered there each year to swap beers and recipes, and enjoy roasted meat and good company. Partiers brought down snow from higher elevations to keep the beer cold.

Each year the party grew more elaborate and more popular, forcing Papazian and his fellow organizers to limit it to 400 attendees.

The experience Papazian gained from Beer and Steer proved invaluable when he founded the American Homebrewers Association. He invited industry professionals to the National Homebrewers Conference, turning a low-key competition into an industry event. Papazian next launched the GABF, which gave aspiring craft brewers an opportunity to meet professional brewers and learn how to scale up their own operations while maintaining quality.

No comments

The Friday Mash (1,500th Blog Post Edition)

We aren’t beginning the Mash with a historical reference because we’re too busy celebrating a milestone. Today’s Mash is the 1,500th post on “Ludwig Roars.” Now excuse us while we refill our pint glasses.

And now….The Mash! 

We begin in the West Bank, where the Taybeh Brewery hosted its 11th annual Oktoberfest. The brewery poured a non-alcoholic beer for festival-goers from neighboring Muslim towns.

Anheuser-Busch InBev’s planned takeover of SAB Miller has advertising agencies worried. Less competition could mean less advertising. That, in turn, could affect the sports industry’s bottom lilne.

A 3,800-year-old poem honoring Ninkasi is also a recipe for Sumerian beer. Brewers have replicated the beer, which tastes like dry apple cider and has a modest 3.5 percent ABV.

Organizers of the Skanderborg Music Festival in Denmark have found an alternative to sleeping in hot tents: giant beer cans that offer a bed with pillows, shelving, a fan, and other amenities.

Jake Anderson, a goalie for the University of Virginia hockey team, was given five-minute major penalty and ejected from the game after chugging a can of Keystone Lite during the second intermission.

Québécois travel writer Caitlin Stall-Paquet takes us a beer-focused road trip through Gaspésie and the Bas-Saint-Laurent. The attractions also include museums, cathedrals, and rock formations.

Finally, Portland beer writer Jeff Alworth, who spent two years traveling and tasting beers, has written The Beer Bible. The 656-page book is accessible, but at the same time, an in-depth exploration of the heritage behind the beers we drink today.

Beer….By the Numbers

  • Number of Oktoberfests held in Munich (including this year’s): 182.
  • Times since 1810 that Oktoberfest was canceled: 24 (reasons include war, hyperinflation, and cholera epidemics).
  • Cost of a one-liter beer at this year’s Oktoberfest: €10 ($11.34).
  • Increase in the price of beer over 2014: 3 percent.
  • Cost of a pint of ale in the UK’s cheapest university town: £2.10 ($3.20), in Durham.
  • Cost of a pint in the UK’s most-expensive university town: £5.25 ($7.90), in Surrey.
  • Bushels of American barley used to brew beer in 2014: 177 million.
  • Brewing’s share of America’s barley crop in 2014: 75.
  • Stadium with the National Football League’s cheapest beer: Paul Brown Stadium, Cincinnati, 36 cents an ounce.
  • Stadium with the NFL’s most expensive beer: Lincoln Financial Field, Philadelphia, 71 cents an ounce.
  • Average per-ounce price of beer in NFL stadiums: 46 cents an ounce.
  • Number of Ontario supermarkets that will sell beer under new provincial legislation: 450 (out of 1,500).
  • Daily sales quota for Ontario supermarkets selling beer: 279 six-packs.
  • Anheuser-Busch InBev and SAB Miller’s combined share of the U.S. beer market: 70 percent.
  • A-B and SAB’s combined revenue from the U.S. beer market: $250 million a year.
  • The State of Beer in China

    This summer, the financial pages have run stories about the woes surrounding China’s economy. But Patti Waldmier, a correspondent for the Financial Times, observes that middle-class Chinese are still spending on high-end items, including local craft beer. What makes craft’s success even more amazing is that small breweries exist in a gray area of Chinese law.

    Many Chinese consider their beer choice an expression of national pride. They prefer beer made from local ingredients and brewed for local palates. For example, a Nanjing brewer named Gao Yan has combined his master’s degree in chemistry with the know-how of traditional Chinese medicine. His best-selling is jasmine tea lager, and has also brewed beer using sweet potatoes, purple rice, chili peppers, and sweet osmanthus flowers.

    The Friday Mash (Tiffany’s Edition)

    On this day in 1837, the retailer now known as Tiffany’s was founded by Charles Lewis Tiffany and Teddy Young in New York City. The founders called their store a “stationery and fancy goods emporium.” However, Tiffany’s didn’t serve breakfast, let alone Founder’s Breakfast Stout.

    And now….The Mash! 

    We begin in Sacramento, where the inaugural California Craft Beer Summit took place. This two-day festival attracted the biggest names in craft brewing, who talked about the state of the industry.

    Listen up, class. Sylvester Schneider, the owner of Zum Schneider in New York City, has prepared a video to show you how to pour wheat, pilsner, and lager beer like a German.

    A boarding school in Zimbabwe has slapped a ban on breakfast cereal. Students mixed it with brown sugar, water, and yeast, then left it in the sun to ferment into beer.

    The recipes for New Belgium Brewing Company’s dubbel and trippel Belgian-style ales are getting a makeover. The changes, which include a different yeast strain, will make the beers more authentically Belgian tasting.

    A video of six Scottish men, drinking beer at the bottom of a swimming pool while on vacation in Florida, was viewed more than 1.8 million times on YouTube in the week after it was posted.

    Greg Koch, the founder of Stone Brewing Company, is stepping down as CEO. He’ll stay on as executive chairman, and he promises not to sell out to one of the big breweries.

    Finally, even though China is a huge beer market, intense competition has made it tough for breweries to make much of a profit. That problem could get worse as the country’s economy slows.

    Brewers Association on A-B InBev and SABMiller

    Yesterday, it was reported that Anheuser-Busch InBev is working to acquire SABMiller. Paul Gatza, the head of the Brewers Association, issued a statement about the proposed deal.

    If acquisition goes through, Gatza believes the federal government would order the combined business to divest itself of Miller brands in the United States. The brands, which are profitable, could be bought by MolsonCoors, or possibly Constellation Brands, Heineken, or Carlsberg. The acquisition would also have an effect on the ten-year joint venture between Miller and Coors, which runs until 2018. It’s unclear what will happen to the Leinenkugel family of beers, currently owned by Miller.

    Gatza believes the takeover would have little impact on what American craft breweries will produce, or their acceptance by the nation’s beer drinkers. He also believes beer distribution won’t change much. He’s less sure of what effect the takeover will have on the wave of mergers and acquisitions in the craft brewing industry, or whether consumers will view craft beer as less of a reflection of the brewers’ “personal passion.” About this he says, “Time will tell all.”

    Powered by WordPress