Beer…By the Numbers

  • Cost of a one-year, all-the-Asahi-you-can-drink, passport at Brasserie Beer Boulevard in Tokyo: 29,800 yen ($282).
  • Average cost of a draft Asahi in downtown Tokyo: 500 yen ($4.74).
  • Wages and benefits paid annually by the U.S. brewing industry: $79 billion.
  • Total taxes paid annually by the U.S. brewing industry: $49 billion.
  • Americans whose ZIP code includes a brewery: 52.9 million.
  • Percentage of Americans whose ZIP code includes a brewery: 17.1.
  • New Glarus Brewing Company’s production in 2013: 146,000 barrels.
  • States in which New Glarus beer is sold: 1 (its home state of Wisconsin).
  • Vermont’s current brewery count: 56.
  • Its brewery count two years ago: 31.
  • Vermont’s annual sales of craft beer: $100 million.
  • Record for most one-liter beer mugs carried by one person: 27 (by Oliver Struempfel of Abensburg, Germany).
  • Total weight of 27 full one-liter mugs: 135 pounds.
  • Breweries represented at this year’s Michigan Brewers Guild U.P. (Upper Peninsula) Beer Festival: 61.
  • Beers poured at the U.P. Beer Festival: more than 400.
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    Beer…By the Numbers

  • Sales of China’s Snow beer in 2013: 87.8 million barrels.
  • Snow’s world-wide rank in sales: 1st (4 of the world’s top 5 brands are Chinese).
  • China’s beer market, compared to the U.S. beer market: 21 percent smaller.
  • Years until China’s beer market will become bigger than the U.S.: 3.
  • Percent of American drinkers who prefer beer: 41.
  • Percent who prefer wine: 31 (23 percent prefer hard liquor).
  • State with the highest per capita consumption of beer: North Dakota (0.96 pints a day).
  • State with the second-highst per capita consumption: Montana (0.9 pints a day).
  • Craft beer sales for the first half of 2013: 9 million barrels.
  • Craft beer sales for the first half of 2014: 10.6 million barrels (an 18-percent increase).
  • Percent of American drinkers who drink craft beer: 23.
  • Percent of Americans who avoid craft beer: 30.
  • Percent of craft beer consumed by men: 72.
  • Cost of a pound of hops in 2004: $3-5.
  • Cost of a pound of cheap hops in 2014: $8. (Hard-to-find Citra hops cost $20 a pound.)
  • Beer…By the Numbers

  • Breweries that will enter a beer in this year’s Great American Beer Festival competition: 1,360.
  • Increase over last year’s competition: 610 (81 percent).
  • Breweries that asked to pour beer at this year’s GABF: 822.
  • Number of breweries that can be accommodated at the GABF venue: 726 (including 96 tables for sponsors).
  • Craft beer’s share of the U.S. market in 1988: 2.6 percent.
  • Its share of the U.S. market in 2013: 8 percent.
  • Imported beer’s share of the U.S. market in 1988: 8.4 percent.
  • Its share of the U.S. market in 2013: 14 percent.
  • Corona Extra’s U.S. sales in 2013: 7.26 million barrels.
  • Modelo Especial’s U.S. sales in 2013: 3.6 million barrels.
  • U.S. annual per capita spending on beer: $356.20.
  • Canada’s annual per capita spending on beer: $351.89.
  • Australia’s annual per capita spending on beer: $747.90.
  • Percent of American men who say they can’t go an entire week without beer: 27.
  • Percent who say they can’t go an entire week without pizza: 31.
  • Beer…By the Numbers

  • Beers entered in this year’s National Homebrewers Competition: 8,172.
  • Increase over last year: 45 percent.
  • Craft breweries in Texas: 98.
  • Their production (including Spoetzl Brewing Company) in 2013: 833,191 barrels.
  • Increase over the year before: 17.3 percent.
  • Full Sail Brewing Company (Hood River, Oregon) production in 2013: 115,000 barrels.
  • States where Full Sail products are distributed: 31.
  • Alcoholic content of Dogfish Head 120 Minute IPA: 18 percent ABV.
  • Average retail price of a bottle of 120 Minute IPA: $8.
  • Strains stored in Britain’s National Collection of Yeast Cultures: more than 4,000.
  • Brewing yeast strains at the National Collection: 800.
  • Breweries represented at the first Colorado Brewers’ Festival in Fort Collins in 1990: 11.
  • Breweries represented at this year’s festival: more than 50.
  • Percent of underage drinkers who admit to binge-drinking: 44.
  • Percent of underage drinkers who binge-drink Bud Light: 13.5.
  • The Friday Mash (King Ludwig Edition)

    On this day in 1886, King Ludwig II of Bavaria passed away. Please join our beer-drinking lion in a moment of silence for the “Mad King” who, among other things, commissioned the fantastic Neuschwanstein Castle, one of the area’s leading tourist attractions.

    And now….The Mash!

    We begin in Petaluma, California, where Lagunitas Brewing Company held its annual Beer Circus. Some guests wore top hats and “ironic facial hair,” while others dressed as figures from popular culture.

    Just in time for Father’s Day: Criquet, a clothing company, has designed a shirt with a reinforced lining that prevents you from destroying it while using the shirttail to twist a beer bottle open.

    Twenty years ago, Lauren Clark quit her desk job to work for a brewery. She then gravitated to writing, and recently published Crafty Bastards, a history of beer in New England.

    Gustav Holst’s The Planets inspired Bell’s Brewing to create a seven-ale series, each of which named for one of the planets in Holst’s suite. The first Planet beer will be released in August.

    St. Louis, which is celebrating its 250th birthday, has 30 craft breweries–and yes, the Budweiser brewery, too. USA Today’s Wendy Pramick has a beer lover’s guide to the city.

    Brock Bristow, a South Carolina attorney, might wind up in the Lobbyists’ Hall of Fame. He persuaded lawmakers to pass the brewery-friendly “Stone Bill”.

    Finally, Jeopardy! for beer geeks. Three female beer bloggers host a monthly trivia night at a bar in Brooklyn. Games consist of four rounds: brewing, history, popular culture, and the “hipster trifecta.”

    Beer…By the Numbers

  • Years since Westvleteren’s Sint Sixtus abbey started brewing beer: 136.
  • Number of monks currently at the abbey: 21.
  • Tickets distributed for this year’s Vermont Brewers Festival: 8,400 (total for three sessions).
  • The time it took for those tickets to sell out: 11 minutes.
  • Number of breweries in Portland, Oregon: 53.
  • Cities in the world with more breweries than Portland: 0.
  • Annual economic impact of Vermont’s craft brewing industry: $196 million.
  • Vermont’s national rank in craft brewing’s per-capita economic impact: 3rd (behind Oregon and Colorado).
  • Off-premise retail chain sales of shandies in 2013: $67 million.
  • Increase over the year before: 227 percent.
  • Summer Shandy’s share of Leinenkugel’s total sales: 50 percent.
  • Stops on the Sierra Nevada’s “Beer Camp Across America” festival circuit: 7.
  • Cost of a general-admission ticket to Beer Camp Across America: $65.
  • Beers poured at this year’s Burning Can canned-beer fest in Colorado: more than 150.
  • “Can-centric” breweries taking part in the festival: 55.
  • What Do Those Symbols on Beer Labels Mean?

    Breweries are among the oldest businesses in the world, and their beer labels are full of symbols from their storied histories. In MentalFloss.com, Nick Green explains the symbolism behind 20 well-known beer labels.

    One of the most common sources of symbols is the brewery’s own history. The eagle on the Yuengling label and the horn on Stella Artois’ harken back to the breweries’ original names. The hometown coat of arms is another source. That’s why there are lions on the Amstel and Modelo Especial labels, and a key on the Beck’s label. Dos Equis resurrected Aztec leader Moctezuma II for its label, and Guinness appropriated the Brian Boru harp.

    Green’s article has some other fun facts. Bass’s red triangle was issued Trademark #1 by the British government; until 1908, the text of the Budweiser label was in German; and legend has it that Miller High Life was called “The Champagne of Beers” because it was released a few days before New Year’s Eve.

    Finally, there’s Rolling Rock’s mysterious “33”. People have offered numerous explanations, but no one knows for sure how and why that number wound up on the label.

    Beer…By the Numbers

  • Events at this year’s Chicago Beer Week: 550.
  • Establishments hosting events at this year’s CBW: more than 350.
  • Breweries in Chicago: 25, plus five in the planning stages.
  • Breweries in the state of Illinois: 81, plus around 30 in the planning stages.
  • Countries to which American beer was exported last year: 107.
  • America’s beer exports to Mexico, the number-one market: 1.3 million barrels.
  • America’s beer exports to Canada, the number-two market: 750,000 barrels.
  • Per-acre cost of a 500-acre aroma hops farm: $30,000 to $40,000.
  • Annual yield from a 500-acre hop farm: 1 million pounds
  • Pounds of hops in an average barrel of national-brand beer: 0.2.
  • Pounds of hops in an average barrel of craft beer: 1.25.
  • Microbrewery openings in the U.S. in 2013: 304.
  • Brewpub openings in the U.S. in 2013: 109.
  • Hispanics’ projected share of the U.S. drinking-age population in 2015: 15 percent.
  • Their projected share in 2045: 25 percent.
  • Beer…By the Numbers

    • Number of beer distributors in the U.S. in the 1970s: more than 5,000.
    • Number of beer distributors in the U.S. today: fewer than 1,000.
    • Beers entered in this year’s World Beer Cup competition: 4,754 (833 more than in 2012).
    • Breweries competing in this year’s World Beer Cup: 1,403.
    • Countries represented in this year’s competition: 58, from 5 continents.
    • Australian per capita beer consumption last year: 4.04 liters.
    • Years since Australian beer consumption has been that low: 69.
    • Beer’s share of Australian alcoholic beverage consumption: 41 percent (wine is second, with 37 percent).
    • Average cost of a beer at a major-league ballpark: $6.09 (unchanged from last season).
    • Most expensive ballpark beer: 65 cents per ounce (Fenway Park, Boston).
    • Cheapest MLB ballpark beer: 28 cents per ounce (Angel Stadium of Anaheim).
    • World of Beer locations in the U.S.: 57.
    • States with World of Beer establishments: 17.
    • Decrease in German beer sales between 2012 and 2013: 2 percent.
    • Total decrease in consumption between 1988 and 2013: 25 percent.

    Beer…By the Numbers

    • Worldwide Trappist brewery count: 10.
    • Trappist breweries’ annual production: 387,000 barrels.
    • Leading Trappist brand Chimay’s share of that total: 40 percent.
    • U.S. beer sales in 2013: 200 million barrels (down 1.4 percent from 2012).
    • U.S. craft beer sales in 2013: 14 million barrels (up 9.6 percent from 2012).
    • Average craft drinker’s annual spending on beer: $181 (11 trips to the store).
    • Average “economy beer” drinker’s annual spending on beer: $252 (18 trips to the store).
    • Cost of a six-pack of Heineken in Oklahoma City (cheapest among cities surveyed by NerdWallet.com): $7.33.
    • Cost of a six-pack of Heineken in Chicago (most expensive among cities surveyed): $12.99.
    • Brewery openings in Colorado in 2013: 57.
    • Colorado’s brewery count at the end of 2013: 217.
    • Anheuser-Busch InBev’s share price in March 2014: $103.75.
    • A-B InBev’s market capitalization in March 2014: $166.83 billion.
    • Cost of a ticket to Three Floyds’ annual Dark Lord Day: $30.
    • Number of tickets sold: 6,000.
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