The Friday Mash (Boiling Point Edition)

On this day in 1743, Jean-Pierre Christin developed the Centigrade temperature scale, with 0 degrees representing water’s freezing point and 100 degrees its boiling point. However, the scale is named for Swedish astronomer Anders Celsius, who came up with a similar idea independently of Christin.

And now…The Mash!

We begin in Chicago, where the Lincoln Park Zoo is collaborating with DryHop Brewers on a new beer that will raise money for polar bears and raise awareness of climate change. The beer, Ursus Mapletimus, is a smoked maple imperial white ale.

Some years ago, a pub owner in England told Arthur Johnson that he’d get free beer for life if he lived to age 100. Johnson reached the century mark, and now he shows up every day for a pint.

Is there a beer without malt or hops? Yes. It’s an alcoholic ginger beer from Ginger’s Revenge, a new brewery in Asheville, North Carolina. The beer is also gluten-free.

Congratulations to Garrett Marrero and Melanie Oxley, who own the Maui Brewing Company. The U.S. Small Business Administration named them “National Small Business Persons of the Year.”

Heineken has launched a zero-alcohol version of its namesake beer. Alcohol-free beers are attractive to brewers because that segment of the market is growing, and beers without alcohol are taxed less heavily.

English heavy-metal band Iron Maiden is coming to the U.S. Also coming to America is Trooper, an award-winning ESB inspired by the band and brewed by Robinsons Brewery.

Finally, Breckenridge Brewing Company has announced the winner of its annual competition to name the official beer of Denver Comic Con. This year’s winner is “I Am Brewt,” a pun on the Guardians of the Galaxy superhero film series.

“Beer It Forward”

American Craft Beer Week begins today, and part of this year’s celebration is #BeerItForward. The Brewers Association explains:

The idea of Beer It Forward is not new–it’s “Pay it Forward,” but with craft beer. Many beer lovers use it to highlight good deeds, like covering the cost of a beer as an act of kindness or someone including more beers in a beer trade than were necessary. Beer it Forward promotes doing good, simply, honestly, without an expectation of reciprocation and with the hope that the act will be passed down the line.

Many craft brewers exemplify this ideal every single day. They believe in the value of community and giving back, supporting causes from veterans to homelessness to a cleaner environment. That’s why this American Craft Beer Week, the theme #beeritforward is directed to the rest of our fine beer community. How can you brighten the lives of others through craft beer? A random act of kindness could be as simple as buying someone a beer. Not only will you be championing small, authentic craft brewers in celebration of their commitment to us, but you’ll be doing so much more.

The Friday Mash (Old School Edition)

On this day in 1364, Jagiellonian University was established in Krakow, Poland; and on this day in 1551, the National University of San Marcos, the oldest in the Americas, was established in Lima, Peru.

And now…The Mash!

We begin in Rochester, New York, where Genesee Brewing Company, which is undergoing a $49 million expansion, plans to transport 12 fermentation tanks via the Erie Canal. The tanks are too big to transport by highway or by rail.

It’s baseball season, and CraftBeer.com would like to introduce you to seven beers brewed especially for minor-league teams. Enjoy them with your peanuts and Cracker Jack.

Think you can’t sing? Organizers of the Twin Cities Beer Choir want to convince you otherwise. You buy the beer, and the Choir provide you with sheet music and plenty of friends.

An Indiana gas station owner found a clever loophole to the state’s ban on selling cold beer at convenience stores. He instal

The Friday Mash (Carnegie Hall Edition)

On this day in 1891, Music Hall in New York City—later known as Carnegie Hall—staged its grand opening and first public performance. The guest conductor that day was none other than Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky.

And now (cue up the music)…The Mash!

We begin in Bozeman, Montana, where Amy Henkle’s Happy Dog Beer Company is brewing “beers” for dogs. They don’t contain alcohol or hops; instead they’re a supplement to be poured on top of regular dog food.

Thirty-five years ago, Knoxville hosted a World’s Fair. Several city residents have teamed up to brew a beer celebrating the fair. It will be available through October, when the fair closed.

Sacramento Bee correspondent Blair Anthony Robertson wonders why new breweries price their beer at world-class levels. High prices result in disappointed customers and ruins the brewery’s goodwill.

If you hold bottled beer by its base, you’re holding it wrong. You should hold it by the neck to prevent the beer from getting warm—just as you should hold a wine glass by the stem.

When a Finnish brewery released a 100-pack of its beer, rival brewery Nokian Panimo one-upped it with a 1,000-pack of Kaiseri beer. To buy one, you need 2,160 euros ($2,350)—and a truck.

Researchers in the UK have found that beer is a more effective pain reliever than generic Tylenol. Having three or four beers—resulting in a BAC of .08—reduces pain by up to 25 percent.

Finally, today is Cinco de Mayo. The Chicago Tribune’s Josh Noel prepared for it by drinking Mexican beers in an effort to find out why they’ve become so popular. The answer is a “complex mix of demographics, marketing, history and nostalgia”.

The Friday Mash (Emerald City Edition)

Fifty-five years ago today, the Century 21 Exhibition aka the Seattle World’s Fair opened. It was the first World’s Fair in America since World War II. Surviving structures from the fair include The Space Needle, the Seattle Monrail, and Seattle Center.

And now…The Mash!

We begin in Boston, where Daradee Murphy unveiled a novel strategy for tackling the Boston Marathon’s infamous “Heartbreak Hill”: beer instead of water as her hydration drink of choice.

Once a hot trend, black IPA lost its mojo last year. However, Bryan Roth of All About Beer magazine says that the style is down but not out: several breweries are rolling out new versions.

Sierra Nevada Brewing Company has announced the dates and cities for Beer Camp on Tour 2017. This year Beer Camp collaborative series will feature six domestic and six overseas craft breweries.

Five years ago, a startling archaeological discovery in modern-day Turkey provided evidence that it was beer, not agriculture, that led human beings to abandon their hunter-gatherer ways and begin living in communities.

Vijay Mallya, India’s “King of Good Times”, is under arrest in England. Mallya, who inherited United Breweries of Kingfisher beer fame, faces fraud and money-laundering charges in his home country.

The former head of a global recruitment firm says it’s time to get rid of the “beer test” for new hires: it leads to poor hiring decisions, discriminates against non-drinkers, and makes the workplace less diverse.

Finally, women’s advocacy group FemCollective is sponsoring an all-female beer festival in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. FemAle will highlight female beer experts and brewers from across the country, and men as well as women are welcome to attend.

Happy Oberon Day, Michiganders

Ludwig, Maryanne, and Paul live in Michigan, where two spring traditions reign supreme: Tigers Opening Day and Oberon Day.

Today, Michiganders flocked to their favorite establishments to enjoy a pint or two of this year’s release of Bell’s Oberon. This American wheat ale was originally called Solsun, but the owners of Mexico’s Sol beer slapped Bell’s with a cease-and-desist order. Larry Bell, who had been in drama club in high school, renamed the beer Oberon, after the king of the fairies in William Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream.

Solsun/Oberon has been part of Michigan’s craft beer scene for 25 years, and many of its fans have posted memories of the beer on social media. Amy Sherman of MLive.com has compiled the best walks down Memory Lane.

As for the Tigers, their home opener is Friday, April 7.

The Friday Mash (“Sell High” Edition)

On this day in 2000, the Nasdaq Composite stock market index peaked at 5132.52, thanks to investors who bid up dot.com shares to astronomically high prices. Those who didn’t take profits got a nasty surprise: the Nasdaq fell by more than 50 percent by year’s end.

And now….The Mash!

Fittingly, we begin on Wall Street, where big breweries’ stocks haven’t been doing well. According to SeekingAlpha.com, the only company whose shares are trading near their 52-week high is Kirin Holdings Company.

Congress is considering a bill that would cut taxes for small brewers. The bill’s supporters contend that lower taxes would enable breweries to expand production, add jobs, and attract more visitors.

Session IPA is popular, but opinions vary as to its definition. Draft magazine has published a scale which shows how much these IPAs vary in alcoholic strength and, especially, perceived bitterness.

A few years ago, Emily Hengstebeck and her friends partied together at beer festivals. Now employed by a brewery, she found herself on the other side of the table. She describes what it’s like.

More than 7,000 CraftBeer.com readers filled out a survey asking them what was their state’s favorite beer bar, and why they liked it. Without further ado, here are the winners in each state.

It’s still “Miller Time” in Chicago. According to BevSpot, Miller has a more than 8-percent market share in the Windy City, more than twice the brand’s market share nationwide.

Finally, a Virginia brewery will release a beer honoring Secretariat, the 1973 Triple Crown winner, at a birthday celebration this month. The horse was nicknamed “Big Red”; the beer is an imperial red India pale ale.

The Friday Mash (Drop the Puck! Edition)

On this day in 1875, the first-ever organized indoor game of ice hockey was played in Montreal. It featured two nine-member teams whose lineups included local college students. Instead of a ball, which was customary in outdoor games, the players used the ancestor of the modern hockey puck.

And now….The Mash!

We begin in Chicago, where White Sox fans are rooting for their team to draft Clemson first baseman Seth Beer. Their campaign includes hashtags with excruciatingly bad puns on Beer’s name.

Uinta Brewing Company is packaging its Golden Ale—a beer meant to be enjoyed outdoors—in cans bearing images of our national parks. Yosemite National Park will be the first to appear on a can.

Budapest’s Mad Scientist Brewery has a deal for you. Adopt a dog from a local animal sanctuary, and the brewery will send you home with a case of its beer—even if your new best friend doesn’t drink.

Asbury Park Brewery’s logo is inspired by the city’s famous Convention Hall. And fittingly for “Springsteen Country”, all of its owners have a connection to the music business.

A New York State lawmaker wants to allow municipalities to establish “recreation zones”, within which it would be legal to carry open containers of alcohol sold by bars and restaurants.

Cathay Pacific Airlines has added something new to its beer menu: Betsy, a beer brewed to be enjoyed at 35,000 feet, where passengers’ senses of taste and smell are diminished.

Finally, according to Amy Sherman of MLive.com, the funniest beer names from last weekend’s Michigan Brewers Guild’s Winter Beer Festival were “Gnome Wrecker”, “Complete Nutter Madness”, and “Only Fools Russian”.

The Friday Mash (“Don’t Cry for Me” Edition)

On this day in 1946, Colonel Juan Peron, founder of the political movement known as Peronism, was elected to his first term as President of Argentina. He and his wife, Eva Duarte, would later become the subject of the Broadway musical Evita.

And now….The Mash!

We begin in Maryland, where craft brewers are concerned about Guinness’ plans to open a taproom at its new brewery. At the same time, retailers worry that raising the cap on how much breweries can sell on-premises will hurt their business.

This year’s beer trends include the “haze craze”: unfiltered and unpasteurized IPAs aka “New England IPAs”. These beers have a shorter shelf life, but are richer in both flavor and aroma.

Atlanta’s SweetWater Brewing Company is paying off a Super Bowl bet by releasing 100 cans of SB51 beer. It’s described as “a soul crushing pale ale that will leave you deflated”.

Tomorrow, Cleveland’s Slovenian community celebrates Kurentovanje, its version of Mardi Gras. Festival-goers will dress up as giant fuzzy animals to scare winter away, and drink beer at the newly-opened Goldhorn Brewery.

Three machinists and designers are about to launch the Kramstein beer stein. This metal stein, which comes in two sizes, is designed to keep the drink cool and the drinker’s hands dry.

Martin Roper, who’s been CEO of the Boston Beer Company for 16 years, plans to step down next year. TheMotleyFool.com speculates on whether Roper’s successor can arrest the company’s recent sales slump.

Finally, the BrewDog brewery offers an unusual perk: a week’s “paw-ternity” leave to employees who adopt a new dog. It also allows employees to bring their dogs to work. The company’s founders worked under the watchful eye of their “brew dog”, Bracken.

Don’t Smoke ‘Em, Even If You’ve Got ‘Em

Last summer, Draft magazine published its complete guide to “Festiquette”: 30 rules for making your beer festival experience, and everyone else’s, better. The rules include “Eat breakfast”, “Don’t pee on random surfaces”, “Don’t break up”, and—people have actually tried this—“Don’t lie and say you own Draft magazine to get into VIP”.

After a bad experience at this year’s Arizona Strong Beer Festival, Draft has added Rule 31: “Leave the cigars at home”. The magazine’s staff contends that smoking cigars is not only a tacky exercise in conspicuous consumption, but it also ruins the purpose of a festival—namely, tasting and enjoying beer—for others. As they put it, “We liken people who light up at beer festivals to people who microwave fish at work: Sure, you’re allowed to do it, but by doing it, you’re creating discomfort for the people around you.”

Powered by WordPress