The Friday Mash (Votes for Women Edition)

On this day in 1920, the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution took effect. It was ratified 42 years after Aaron Sargent, a Republican from California, first introduced a women’s suffrage resolution in the Senate.

And now…The Mash!

We begin in Rio de Janiero, where souvenir cups of Ambev’s beer Skol were wildly popular at the 2016 Summer Olympics. Some fans spent hundreds of dollars to get Skol’s complete 42-cup collection.

With The Beer Tie, you can make a fashion statement and enjoy your beer at the same time. The tie is made of the same insulating, waterproof neoprene material as a standard drink koozie.

How much beer must “Bender”, the robot from Futurama, drink in order to keep his battery powered? According to Megan Logan of Inverse magazine, it’s 2.7 million liters. Per day.

The museum store at the Arizona Capitol could start selling local beer this fall. Alcohol isn’t exactly banned at the Capitol. Lawmakers are known to cary red Solo cups during late-night sessions.

The Innis & Gunn brewery offers a virtual-reality trip to Scotland to be enjoyed with a pint. The scientist who helped create the VR says that it connects the brain with the beer’s oak-aged tones.

Twenty-one years ago, Norwegian police ended an airplane hijacking by persuading the hijacker—who had been drinking heavily—to swap his loaded gun for a fresh supply of beer.

Finally, Suicide Squad actress Margot Robbie is a big fan of shower beers. She said that after a tough day of shooting, an ice-cold beer in a boiling-hot shower helps her fall asleep.

The Hop Doctor is In

A casual acquaintance with “Dr. Paul Matthews IPA” led writer Russell Shorto to the doctor himself. The man whose brewery made that ale called Matthews “Lord of the Hops”. However, Matthew describes himself more modestly: “I’m a plant engineer and evolutionary biologist.”

Matthews is the senior research scientist at Hopsteiner, a major hops trader and processor in Washington State’s Yakima Valley. Hopsteiner is a beneficiary of America’s IPA boom. It has ratcheted up demand for hops but, on the other hand, has kept hops suppliers scrambling to meet changing tastes. And that has kept Matthews—pun intended—hopping around the world in search of new varieties.

Matthews has gone to out-of-the-way places such as Arizona’s Sky Islands, surrounded by miles of desert; and the former Soviet republic of Georgia, where for years people have used wild hops to cure their breads and as a folk medicine.

Even though the hop plant is closely related to the cannabis plant, Matthews isn’t interested in psychoactive beer. But, he says, others are looking into it.

The Wednesday Mash (Year-End Clearance Edition)

Ludwig is on Christmas break, and won’t be back until January 4. In the meantime, Maryanne and Paul are filling in for him.

And now….The Mash!

We begin in Richmond, Virginia, where it’s been a banner year for craft beer. Four new breweries and a meadery have opened their doors; and Stone Brewing Company will start up next spring.

Anheuser-Busch is giving Bud Light cans a makeover. Alissa Walker of Gizmodo.com says the can’s new design signals an end to the brand’s frat-boyish “Whatever” campaign.

Responding to a new Indonesian law banning beer sales in convenience stores, Diageo is brewing a non-alcoholic version of Guinness to be sold in that country. It’s called “Guinness Zero.”

More than 30 Arizona breweries are collaborating on an all-female-brewed beer. It’s a red IPA, and proceeds from its sale will go to Go Red for Women, an American Heart Association charity.

Despite Zimbabwe’s economic collapse, people are finding solace in beer. Observers say that bars in the capital city, Harare, are packed with holiday revelers.

Manhattan resident Leif Nelson has sued Miller Brewing Company for falsely representing that Foster’s is brewed in Australia. Brewing operations were moved to Texas in 2011.

Finally, scientists at the University of Pennsylvania found that people drink more on days when they exercise more. Perhaps they’re drinking to extend the “buzz” that physical activity brings.

Beer…By the Numbers

  • Texas’ craft brewery count in 2014: 119.
  • Its craft brewery count in 2013: 93.
  • India’s craft brewery count: 45.
  • Craft breweries in Bangalore: 18 (more than any other city in India).
  • Craft beer’s share of the U.S. marketplace, by volume, in 2014: 11 percent.
  • Craft beer production in 2014: 22.2 million barrels (18 percent increase, by volume, over 2013).
  • U.S. brewery count at the end of 2014: 3,464.
  • Brewery openings during 2014: 615.
  • Brewery closings during 2014: 46.
  • Retail locations an Arizona brewery may own, under newly-signed legislation: 7.
  • Maximum amount of a beer an Arizona brewery may produce and still sell food: 200,000 barrels.
  • Cost of a 16-ounce beer at an Arizona Diamondbacks game: $4 (cheapest in Major League Baseball).
  • Average cost of a 16-ounce beer at a major-league ballpark: $5.98.
  • Establishments taking part in this year’s Madison Beer Week: 80.
  • Events scheduled for this year’s Madison Beer Week: 350.
  • The Tuesday Mash (News Glut Edition)

    Because it’s Ludwig’s job to keep you informed.

    We begin in Whitefish, Montana, where the Black Star Brewery has launched its latest contest. Tell Black Star what you would barter to win a trip for two to Montana plus free beer for a year.

    Watch out, Guinness. Camden Town Brewing, a London micro, wants to challenge Guinness Stout’s domination of the British stout market. Camden Town’s brew is called “Black Ink.”

    Kai Olson-Sawyer of EcoCentric.com gives us two more reasons to “drink locally”: microbreweries strengthen communities, and have a positive impact on the environment as well.

    The Mother Road Brewing Company of Flagstaff, Arizona, is not only located on an older alignment of Route 66, but three of beers’ names are inspired by the famous highway.

    SeriousEats.com pays attention to an underappreciated style–namely, American Brown Ale. Nick Leiby says there are plenty of good versions to choose from.

    Eric Asimov of the New York Times took note of the popularity of sour beers in America. He and his friends’ favorite was a Kriek ale from Cascade in Portland, Ore.

    Finally, California’s Firestone Walker Brewing Company brews its flagship a pale ale using a brewing method based on the Burton Union fermentation system. Why? Because
    Englishman David Walker is in charge of brewing.

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