Australia

The Friday Mash (Emoticon Edition)

On this day in 1982, Scott Fahlman posted the first documented emoticons, :-) and :-( , on the Carnegie Mellon University Bulletin Board System. So now you know who to blame.

And now….The (emoticon-free) Mash!

We begin in Israel, where Itsik Levy named his brewery “Isis” after an Egyptian goddess. Now that the Islamic State is using that name, Levy said—tongue in cheek—that he’s considering “a massive lawsuit” against it.

D’oh! Australian regulators ordered Woolworth’s to stop selling Duff beer because the brand’s association with The Simpsons made it too appealing to would-be underage drinkers.

Scientists say that the fastest way to chill beer is to pour plenty of salt into a bucket of water, then add ice, and then drop in the beer. It’ll be cold in 20 minutes or less.

For Ohio to get Stone Brewing Company’s second brewery, lawmakers will have to raise the ABV cap. Some of Stone’s ales exceed the current 12-percent cap and thus can’t be brewed in Ohio.

Britain’s Prince Harry celebrated his 30th birthday by downing a beer at the Invictus Games. He has good reason to celebrate: now that he’s 30, he inherits $17.4 million from his mother, the late Princess Diana.

The Beer Geeks are returning to this year’s Great American Beer Festival. They’re a corps of 3,000 volunteers who are trained by the Brewers Association to tell festival-goers more about the beers they’re sampling.

Finally, Beverage Grades, a Denver company that analyzes the content of beer and wine, offers a “Copy Cat” app which tells where you can find beer with similar tastes to those you like.

No comments

Beer…By the Numbers

  • Breweries that will enter a beer in this year’s Great American Beer Festival competition: 1,360.
  • Increase over last year’s competition: 610 (81 percent).
  • Breweries that asked to pour beer at this year’s GABF: 822.
  • Number of breweries that can be accommodated at the GABF venue: 726 (including 96 tables for sponsors).
  • Craft beer’s share of the U.S. market in 1988: 2.6 percent.
  • Its share of the U.S. market in 2013: 8 percent.
  • Imported beer’s share of the U.S. market in 1988: 8.4 percent.
  • Its share of the U.S. market in 2013: 14 percent.
  • Corona Extra’s U.S. sales in 2013: 7.26 million barrels.
  • Modelo Especial’s U.S. sales in 2013: 3.6 million barrels.
  • U.S. annual per capita spending on beer: $356.20.
  • Canada’s annual per capita spending on beer: $351.89.
  • Australia’s annual per capita spending on beer: $747.90.
  • Percent of American men who say they can’t go an entire week without beer: 27.
  • Percent who say they can’t go an entire week without pizza: 31.
  • The Friday Mash (Louisiana Purchase Edition)

    Two hundred and ten years ago today, the Louisiana Purchase was finalized at a ceremony in New Orleans. The U.S. paid France 50 million francs for what became all or part of 15 present-day states. The cost of all that land? Less than a Jefferson nickel per acre.

    And now….The Mash!

    We begin in Belgium, where the Abbey of Notre Dame d’Orval can’t meet demand for Orval ale. The reason? The number of monks has fallen from 35 in the 1980s to 12 today.

    Fancy a pint? The next beer you order might might be served in a tulip, a chalice, a snifter, or stemware instead of a “shaker pint”, especially if you’re having a high-gravity ale.

    Oops! Lehigh University’s Chi Phi fraternity was suspended after members posted a photo of hundreds of cups of beer inside what’s supposed to be a dry frat house.

    What happens when you give four Aussie guys beer and a video camera? You get beer-fueled one-upmanship that results in productive content creation for Carlton Dry.

    Do you know what “foeder” is? Lauren Salazar of New Belgium Brewing Company explains how these large oak barrels need to be babied before they hold what will become Belgian-style sour beer.

    Want a 22-ouncer of your favorite craft beer? In some Sacramento neighborhoods, you can’t get one because single-bottle sales are banned, regardless of the quality of the beer.

    Finally, fans attending Miami Dolphins games at Sun Life Stadium can download an app which warns them when beer sales are about to end, and even directs them to a stand with shorter lines.

    The Friday Mash (Superstition Edition)

    Today is Friday the 13th, a day dreaded by the superstitious. However, Ludwig and his staff at the Mash agree with baseball (and beer-drinking) legend Babe Ruth, who said, “I have only one superstition. I make sure to touch all the bases when I hit a home run.”

    And now…the Mash!

    We begin in Chicago, where Old Style beer will end its 63-year run at Wrigley Field at the end of this season. Next year, Anheuser-Busch will become the Cubs’ exclusive beer sponsor.

    Shares of Boston Beer Company (ticker symbol: SAM) have appreciated by 1,000 percent in the past ten years, which means the company’s CEO, Jim Koch, is now a billionaire.

    Since 1935, Wyoming’s beer tax has been two cents a gallon. State lawmakers are considering raising the tax to help fund substance-abuse programs. The nation’s median beer tax is 19 cents.

    East Asian beer lovers can now buy Hello Kitty beer in six tropical fruit flavors. The brewer points out that the beer is aimed at adults who grew up with the cartoon cat, who turns 40 next year.

    Good beer in Vegas? You bet! (Sorry, Ludwig couldn’t resist.) Renee LiButti of Blog.Vegas.com offers her list of the five best places in town to get a craft brew.

    A feral pig in Australia had a fight with a cow after guzzling three six-packs of beer left out by campers. The pig was later found sleeping under a tree, presumably nursing a hangover.

    Finally, three friends have invented the Case Coolie, a lightweight carrier that keeps a 30-pack of beer cold without ice. Just in time for football tailgating.

    The Friday Mash (Uncle Miltie Edition)

    On this day in 1908, actor and comedian Milton Berle was born. As the host of NBC’s Texaco Star Theater, Berle was the first major American television star. He’s known to millions of viewers of a certain age as “Uncle Miltie.”

    And now….The Mash!

    We begin in the middle of Tampa Bay, where–if summer storms haven’t inundated it–you’ll find Beer Can Island. Non-drinkers refer it to it by its official name, Pine Key.

    If you have vacation time coming and money to spend, consider a luxury beer vacation. Sarah Bennett of CNN.com picks America’s ten best beer-themed getaway locations.

    Once again, North Dakota ranks number-one in per-capita beer consumption. The Roughrider State also ranks first in bars per capita, with one for every 1,620 adults.

    Sam Calagione, the head of Dogfish Head Craft Brewed Ales, is known for adding food to beer. Now he’s created a line of beer-infused foods that includes chowder, pickles, and brownies.

    Earlier this month, Darwin, Australia, held its annual Beer Can Regatta. To win, a skipper has to battle water, waves, and high construction costs–namely, a 10-cents-per-can deposit.

    Smithsonian magazine’s Alastair Bland likes to hide bottles of rare beer in beautiful locations, then dare his readers to find them. Bland’s latest “Trail of Ale” is in northern California.

    Finally, Will Gordon of Deadspin.com ranks 36 cheap American beers. Top honors went to Grain Belt Premium, which Gordon describes as “smooth, creamy, and dreamy.” His worst? Keystone.

    The Friday (Sour) Mash

    On this day in 1790, in Bourbon County, Kentucky, an American clergyman named Elijah Craig produced the first batch of whiskey distilled from corn. What better excuse to have a beer aged in a bourbon barrel?

    And now….The Mash!

    We begin in Cambridge, England, where the city’s first Bitcoin transaction recently took place. Andrew Bower bought a pint of beer at The Haymakers for just over 0.02 Bitcoins, or £1.55.

    Can’t find a bottle opener? S.E. Smith of Networx.com to the rescue. He has 16 ways to open a beer bottle without one–and without damaging your teeth.

    Japanese craft brewers might get a boost from their government’s decision to weaken the yen in an effort to stimulate the economy. A weak yen means higher prices for imported brands.

    Fort Collins, Colorado, is one of the nation’s top beer destinations. For your enjoyment, the staff at FermentedlyChallenged.com has compiled a three-day guide to the city’s breweries and bars.

    If you’re in the lower deck at U.S. Cellular Field in Chicago, listen for Mark Reiner, the singing beer vendor. He sings his personalized spiels to the tune of pop songs any fan would recognize.

    Crikey! Residents of a Melbourne, Australia, suburb discovered their cellphones weren’t working. The problem? Radio waves emitted by a neighbor’s beer fridge.

    Finally, craft beer returns to television this fall. The new Esquire Network will air a show titled “BrewDogs” starring James Watt and Martin Dickie, the founders of–you guessed it–BrewDog.

    The Friday Mash (QWERTY Edition)

    One hundred and forty years ago today, E. Remington and Sons in Ilion, New York, began production of the first practical typewriter. Even though few of us use typewriters anymore, the familiar “QWERTY” keyboard design, invented in 1874, is still with us.

    ASDF…The Mash!

    We begin in Massachusetts where Todd Ruggere, a Waltham resident, is drinking a Sam Adams in each of the Commonwealth’s 351 cities and towns. He’s raising money for cancer research.

    We all know that higher-gravity beers are able to conceal hop bitterness. With that in mind, Jay Brooks recently posted an original gravity to hops ratio graph on his Brookston Beer Bulletin.

    In 1953, an Aussie named Bob Hawke set a world record by downing a yard of ale–more than two pints–in 11 seconds. He was later elected that country’s Prime Minister. Coincidence?

    Good news for beer lovers in Manhattan. The Hudson River Park Trust will open a 6,000-square-foot beer garden overlooking the river at Pier 62. It will serve craft beers and specialty food.

    Kegasus, the beer-guzzling centaur that advertises the Preakness InfieldFest, will likely be scratched from this year’s race. But there will be live entertainment, and plenty of beer.

    Pro tip: it’s not a good idea to drink to excess before designing beer labels, because you might come up with something like this disturbing Belgian ale label.

    Finally, congratulations to Warren Monteiro, a writer, beer traveler, and homebrewer from New York City, who was named Beerdrinker of the Year at the Wynkoop Brewing Company.

    The Friday Mash (Penny Wise Edition)

    February 15, 1971, was Decimal Day in Britain. From that day forward, the pound sterling was worth 100 pence; and shillings, half-crowns, florins and other charming coinage passed into British history.

    And now…The Mash!

    We begin in Australia, where that country’s governing body for cricket is combating the dreaded beer snake created by fans stacking thousands of cups through the grandstand.

    John Schreiber of Manhattan Beach, California, has come up with beer pairings for Girl Scout cookies. For example, Thin Mints call for an old ale, like North Coast Brewing Old Stock Ale.

    Jay Brooks has posted a new Periodic Table of Beer Styles at his Brookston Beer Bulletin. Credit for the table goes to a Reddit user named “Delirium Tremens.”

    Something old, something new. The Epiphany One Puck will recharge your phone with a cold beer. The devices uses a Stirling engine, which turns heat disparities into energy.

    NerdWallet.com scoured the country for the city with the cheapest beer. It’s Carlsbad, New Mexico, where a six-pack of Heineken costs $7.25. Most expensive? New York City, where the same sixer carries a $12.63 price tag.

    Why has Sam Adams Alpine Spring been on the shelves for weeks? Jim Koch, Boston Beer Company’s CEO, explains that “in New England, we tend to look forward to next season.”

    Finally, Bavarian glassmaker Spiegelau, with help from Sierra Nevada and Dogfish Head, have developed a glass designed for drinking IPA. Its ridges at the bottom bring out flavor by creating more foam.

    The Friday Mash (Pliny the Elder Edition)

    On this day in 79 B.C., Mount Vesuvius erupted, wiping out the towns of Pompeii and Herculaneum and killing more than 15,000 people. Its most famous victim was Pliny the Elder, the naturalist whose writings about hops earned him recognition from the Russian River Brewing Company. The brewery’s renowned double IPA bears his name.

    And now…The Mash!

    We begin in Morgantown, the home of West Virginia University, which has reclaimed the number-one spot in the Princeton Review’s ranking of top party schools. WVU also ranks first in the “Lots of Beer” category.

    You can’t win ‘em all. Olympic athlete Nick Symmonds came up six seconds short of the world record for running the Beer Mile, in which contestants chug a beer before the race and at each quarter mile.

    Australian scientists have found that feeding brewer’s grain to cows can reduce their methane emissions by at least 15 percent. Methane is a potent greenhouse gas, and cows burp up a lot of it.

    With this beer I thee wed? Many couples are substituting craft beer for Champagne toasts at their wedding receptions. Their beer selections often honor the states the bride and groom come from.

    Visitors to Fort Collins, Colorado, can now spend the day beer touring on a bicycle. There are six breweries located along three miles of trails, along with a “bike library” that will rent you one.

    Boxed wine has been on store shelves for years, but will drinkers buy beer in square bottles? Heineken is experimenting with them.

    Finally, a 1940 ad for Schaefer Bock Beer, which looked like something out of a Dr. Seuss book, inspired the Village Voice’s Eric Sundermann to write a beery version of One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish.

    The Friday Mash (Show Me Edition)

    On this day in 1821, Missouri was admitted to the Union. The “Show-Me State,” which has a substantial German-American population, has never enacted statewide prohibition, has no “blue laws,” and expressly prohibits any jurisdiction from voting itself dry. In other words, it’s a beer-friendly state.

    And now…The Mash!

    We begin in Newport, Kentucky, where a local journalist plans to bring back Wiedemann beer, which was brewed in that city for a century before production ended in 1983.

    New Belgium Brewing Company has teamed up with Brewery Vivant of Grand Rapids, Michigan, to brew an ale honoring Georges Auguste Escoffier, the legendary chef. The ale is a Belgian-style amber ale with a formidable 9.5% ABV.

    Michigan has 118 breweries, with still more under construction. Which makes Rod Kackley of Crain’s Detroit Business wonder where the state will someday have too many breweries.

    From the Point/Counterpoint Department: New York Times readers weigh in on the decision by Greenwood Park, a Brooklyn beer garden, to let parents bring their children.

    Two seniors at George Washington University have started a PAC whose aim is to encourage politicians of both parties to settle their differences over a few cold ones. No, it isn’t called the Six PAC.

    Beers from England’s Lake District impressed the judges at this year’s Great British Beer Festival. Coniston Brewing Company’s No. 9 Barley Wine was declared Supreme Champion of this years’ GBBF competition.

    Finally, a company in the Australian Outback is so desperate to hire skilled electricians that it’s offering free beer to qualified new hires. That, plus up to A$50 per hour.

    Powered by WordPress