Bell’s Beer

Happy Oberon Day, Michiganders

Ludwig, Maryanne, and Paul live in Michigan, where two spring traditions reign supreme: Tigers Opening Day and Oberon Day.

Today, Michiganders flocked to their favorite establishments to enjoy a pint or two of this year’s release of Bell’s Oberon. This American wheat ale was originally called Solsun, but the owners of Mexico’s Sol beer slapped Bell’s with a cease-and-desist order. Larry Bell, who had been in drama club in high school, renamed the beer Oberon, after the king of the fairies in William Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream.

Solsun/Oberon has been part of Michigan’s craft beer scene for 25 years, and many of its fans have posted memories of the beer on social media. Amy Sherman of MLive.com has compiled the best walks down Memory Lane.

As for the Tigers, their home opener is Friday, April 7.

Funniest Beer Description Ever?

A Stan Hiernymous blog post contained one of the funniest beer descriptions we’ve seen. John Mallett, the production manager at Bell’s Beer, observed that craft beer drinkers’ tastes have evolved so much that aromas once considered offensive have become desirable. Case in point, Bell’s Hopslam:

“I’m going to have a beer that we make 4,000 barrels of, one time a year. It flies off the shelf at damn near $20 a six-pack, and you know what it smells like? It smells like your cat ate your weed and then pissed in the Christmas tree.”

Try to top that.

The Friday Mash (Let it Snow Edition)

On this day in 1887, the world’s largest-ever snowflakes–15 inches wide and eight inches thick–fell on Fort Keogh, Montana. It is not known what the people who saw those flakes were drinking at the time, but was probably a lot stronger than Big Sky Moose Drool.

And now…The Mash!

We begin in our home state of Michigan, which now has 85 breweries. Bell’s Beer, the biggest of them all, doubled its sales in 2010, and is planning further expansions in the years to come.

The Baltimore Sun’s Eric Maza brings up to date on local brewery tours. He mentions Delaware’s new a Wine and Ale Trail.

Some things don’t change. Ron Pattinson has posted on his Shut Up About Barkley Perkins blog a story about drunken young Brits wreaking havoc while overseas. The story was written in 1843, in an Indian newspaper. Guess what they were drinking?

David Jensen, who hosted Session #47, serves us a round-up of beer blogger cooking with beer. The Scotch eggs with beery mayonnaise sounds tasty.

According to Thomas and Carol Sinclair, the authors of a history of agriculture, humans lived on a diet of bread and beer for thousands of years. The downside? Vitamin deficiencies, cognitive impairment, high infant mortality, and fetal alcohol syndrome.

Greg Kitsock hopes the popularity of black IPA will get beer lovers interested in dunkels. Kitsock reviews a number of dark lagers, domestic and imported.

A trip to the local dog park got beer writer John Holl thinking about dogs in beer advertising, and whether his beloved Pepper has a chance at stardom.

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