Brooklyn Brewery

The Friday Mash (Georgia Bulldogs Edition)

On this day in 1785, the University of Georgia opened its doors. UGA is the first state-chartered university in the United States, and is the birthplace of the American system of public higher education.

And now…The Mash!

We begin in Massachusetts, where the state’s top liquor regulator is “ready to put everything on the table” in an effort to modernize the liquor code. That includes lifting Draconian limits on the number of licenses a community can issue.

Craft beer—sort of—is on the shelves at Wal-Mart. Its brand name is Trouble, it’s apparently contract-brewed by Genesee Brewing, and it got panned by a panel of Washington Post staffers.

Jake Tuck of Eater magazine explains “beer poptimism”: a growing appreciation of beers that are “unassailably popular, widely accessible, and highly quaffable”. Yes, that means macro brews.

In Bishkek, the capital of Krygystan, two women have opened a craft brewery called Save the Ales. Much of the beer sold in that country consists of bland imports and watery local products.

A startup called Colorado Craft Distributors aims to serve “small but special” breweries looking to get their beer into liquor stores, bars, and restaurants along the state’s Front Range.

Brooklyn Brewery has made a beer using Saccharomyces carlsbergensis, the lager yeast isolated in 1883 by Emil Christian Hansen, a researcher at the Carlsberg Laboratory in Copenhagen.

Finally, actor Matt Damon, the co-founder of Water.org, has joined forces with the brewer of Stella Artois beer to bring clean water to people in developing countries. Every pint of Stella sold in Britain guarantees someone a month’s supply of water.

The Friday Mash (High-Flying Edition)

On this day in 1927, Charles Lindbergh took off from Roosevelt Field in New York, beginning the first-ever solo trans-Atlantic flight. Five years later, Amelia Earhart became the first female aviator to accomplish that feat.

And now…The Mash!

We begin in the halls of justice, where Flying Dog Ales will fund a “First Amendment Society” with the settlement money the state of Michigan paid it. The courts ruled that Michigan violated Flying Dog’s constitutional rights by denying it permission to market Raging Bitch Belgian-Style IPA.

The Brooklyn Brewery has signed a long-term lease under which it will build a beer garden, brewing facility, and restaurant on the site of the Brooklyn Navy Yard..

A Munich court ordered the Hofbraukeller beer hall to honor its contract to host an event hosted by a far-right political party. In 1919, Adolf Hitler delivered his first-ever political speech at the Hofbraukeller.

Mercedes-Benz Stadium, soon to be the new home of the Atlanta Falcons, will have the cheapest beer in the National Football League: $5. It will also offer $3 hot dogs and $2 Coca-Colas.

Some of the biggest names in Chicago’s beer community have joined an effort to raise funds to build the Chicago Brewseum. It will serve beer made on-premises by guest brewers.

Former major-leaguer Brandon Laird, now playing for Japan’s Hokkaido Nippon-Ham Fighters, won himself a year’s supply of beer after hitting a home run off the Kirin Brewery sign at the Tokyo Dome.

Finally, the Saugatuck Brewing Company wasted no time poking fun at Anheuser-Busch’s rebranding of Budweiser as “America”. Its parody beer, “‘Murica”, is brewed in a style America’s founders might describe as “Freedom,” and the process is naturally overseen by 1,776 bald eagles.

Brooklyn: Ghosts of Breweries Past

Once upon a time, Brooklyn, New York, was a claimant for the title of the nation’s brewing capital. During the 1850s, Meserole Street was “Brewers Row,” with at least a dozen breweries; and the brewery owners built grand homes for their families on Bushwick Avenue.

Two breweries, Schaefer and Rheingold, dominated Brooklyn—and the New York area’s brewing industry–in the 20th century. Then came Prohibition, labor unrest, and industry consolidation. Both breweries closed in 1976, though Schaefer is still brewed under contract by Pabst. Today, little remains of the Schaefer and Rheingold brewery complexes. The last of the Schaefer buildings are being demolished to make way for Brooklyn’s modern-day growth industry: housing.

A small-scale brewing revival might be coming. Braven Brewing, whose beers are brewed upstate, hopes to acquire space in Brooklyn and open for business next year. And Steve Hindy, the founder of Brooklyn Brewery, is already looking for new facilities in the borough, even though the brewery’s current lease doesn’t expire until 2020.

A Brewery Grows in Brooklyn

Economic reality forced many brewery entrepreneurs to set up shop in run-down urban neighborhoods where rents were low and residents–if there were any–were unlikely to object. It turns out that some of those breweries have revived their neighborhoods.

One example is Brooklyn’s Williamsburg section, where Brooklyn Brewery opened in 1996. At the time, its neighbors were mostly deserted warehouses and factories. Today, Brooklyn Brewery is surrounded by modern apartment buildings, bars, shops and restaurants. New residents are willing to spend money–a lot of it–to live there.

Cleveland’s Ohio City district, west of downtown, is another. Great Lakes Brewing opened in 1988. Its owners built a brewery and a brewpub from structures that once housed a feed store, a saloon, and a livery stable. Other businesses followed. Ohio City has actually gained population, even as the city as a whole lost population.

Other examples include South Boston (Harpoon Brewery); San Francisco’s SoMa (21st Amendment Brewery); and coming soon, the South Bronx’s Mott Haven section (Bronx Brewery).

The Friday Mash

Joshua Kay of the Ann Arbor Craft Beer Examiner reviews the Jolly Pumpkin Cafe and Brewery…..The Brooklyn Brewery received a grant from the State of New York which will allow it to expand its on-premise capacity from 8,000 to 50,000 barrels….The latest art-related post on the Brookston Beer Bulletin features English artist George Moreland and his depiction of “alehouse politicians.”…The folks at Brewvana answer a burning culinary question: what is the proper beer pairing for Rocky Mountain oysters?…Finally, as if you needed any more reason to visit Portland, the Oregonian’s John Foyston provides a rundown of establishments that offer games. Not just darts and pub trivia, but Skee-Ball, which Paul excelled at in his formative years.

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