Cincinnati

The Friday Mash (Vampire Weekend Edition)

One hundred and twenty years ago today, Bram Stoker’s novel Dracula was published. Stoker didn’t invent the vampire, but his version made it a staple of pop culture—as viewers of The Walking Dead will attest.

And now…The Mash!

We begin in Denver, where the opening of Coors Field in 1995 helped turn the city’s Lower Downtown neighborhood into a craft beer mecca. One LoDo establishment, Wynkoop Brewing Company, helped propel ex-owner John Hickenlooper into the governor’s mansion.

Country Boy Brewing celebrated Lexington Beer Week by hosting its fourth annual beer cheese competition. The product, made of beer, sharp Cheddar, salt, and garlic, is found throughout Kentucky.

Most tourists visit Florence, Italy, for its many museums and works of art. However, craft beer has joined the list of the city’s tourist attractions—if you know where to look.

The Brewers Association has released its 2017 Beer Style Guidelines. They’re presented in a concise new format that removes redundant language, is easier to read, and is more user-friendly.

Corey Bellemore told BleacherReport.com how he became the world-record holder for the Beer Mile. It helps that he can hold his liquor; his personal best is 18 beers at one session.

Just in time for summer: Cincinnati’s Rheingeist Brewing Company has team up with United Dairy Farmers to make a beer-flavored ice cream. The beer is Rheingeist Truth IPA.

Finally, Bob’s Place, South Carolina’s oldest continuously operating beer joint, has burned to the ground. Bob’s offered “live music, dancing in the streets, horseshoes, bonfires at night, and tasty food from the road kill grill.”

A Six-Pack of Beer Travel Articles

It’s that time of the year to plan for summer travel. In case you haven’t decided where to visit, we’ve rounded up six articles on promising beer destinations.

Beer…By the Numbers

  • Brewpubs’ share of American breweries in 2009: 61 percent.
  • Their share of American breweries in 2015: 41 percent.
  • Craft beer’s share of the U.S. beer market in 2016: 12.3 percent.
  • Its share of the U.S. beer market in five years earlier: 5.7 percent.
  • Mexican beer sales in the U.S. in 2016: 22 million barrels.
  • Mexican beer’s share of the U.S. imported beer market: 66 percent.
  • Beer industry’s total economic impact on the U.S. economy in 2014: $252 billion.
  • Total beer industry employment, direct and indirect, in 2014: More than 1.75 million people.
  • Total wages paid to beer industry employees in 2014: More than $78 billion.
  • BrewDog’s imputed valuation: $1 billion (based on what the $263 million TSG Consumer Partners paid for a 23-percent stake).
  • Return on investment for BrewDog’s original investors: 2,800 percent.
  • Annual per capita beer consumption in New York City: 4 gallons.
  • Annual per capita beer consumption in Kiev, Ukraine: 27 gallons.
  • Number of beers at Great American Ballpark in Cincinnati: 132.
  • Number of beers at the average major league ballpark: 50.
  • The Friday Mash (Gold Record Edition)

    Seventy-five years ago, the first-ever gold record was presented to Glenn Miller for “Chattanooga Choo Choo”. The song was originally featured in the film Sun Valley Serenade (1941).

    And now….The Mash!

    We begin in Cincinnati, where Urban Artifact is brewing a beer made with yeasts from the historic Union Terminal, which is now a museum complex. The brewery added sour cherries to add tart fruitiness to the beer, a 7% ABV bock.

    If you’re a Game of Thrones fan, Brewery Ommegang has you covered. It will release three beers whose labels bear the sigils of the Houses of Lannister, Stark, and Targaryen.

    Alex P. Davis, who runs the Library Alehouse in Santa Monica, doesn’t think beer lovers should stand in line to taste rare beers such as Pliny the Elder IPA because so many world-class beers are available without the wait.

    Despite being the capital of one of Mexico’s poorest states, Oaxaca City has become destination of hipster tourists—many of from other Mexican states. And it’s developed a lively craft beer culture.

    TheMotleyFool.com explains how Anheuser-Busch InBev and MillerCoors are exploiting the three-tier system to keep craft products out of bars and stores. Rather than fight A-B, Craft Brew Alliance entered into in a production and distribution deal with the brewing giant.

    Rochester, New York, is the nation’s unofficial Tater Tots capital. Local journalist Will Cleveland has a few pointers on pairing beer with the tots—and yes, any beer from the Genesee family is a good choice.

    Finally, The Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History has appointed Theresa McCulla as historian to oversee its American Brewing History Initiative. McCulla, who will receive a Ph.D in American Studies from Harvard, also holds a culinary arts diploma.

    The Friday Mash (Mickey D’s Edition)

    On this day in 1955, the first McDonald’s restaurant franchised by Ray Kroc, opened in Des Plaines, Illinois. This event is considered the official founding of McDonald’s Corporation, which now has some 68,000 locations in 119 countries worldwide.

    And now…The Mash!

    We begin in Cincinnati, where Queen City Exchanges learned they can’t offer NYSE-like “dynamic pricing” of its beers. Ohio law forbids a retailer to change the price of beer more than once a month.

    Federal regulators ruled that the Indeed Brewing Company’s “Lavender Sunflower Date aka LSD Honey Ale”, wasn’t an acceptable name–even though the beer contains no hallucinogens.

    Colorado has seen a long-running battle over selling full-strength beer in grocery stores. If the stores win, 3.2 beer will likely disappear from the state.

    Author Franz Kafka had a terrible relationship with his bullying father, and the two had almost nothing common–except an appreciation of beer: Czech beer, of course.

    More than 30 North Carolina craft breweries are joining forces to brew a special beer to fight House Bill 2, a new state law that rolls back municipal protections of LGBT people.

    Sterling, a 150-plus-year-old Louisville-brewed beer, is making a comeback. The brand is known for a 1960-70s series of beers named after Kentucky Derby winners.

    Finally, one consequence of the U.S. easing travel restrictions to Cuba has been a run on local beer. Cerveceria Bucanero can’t make enough Cristal beer to keep up with tourist-fueled demand.

    The Friday Mash (Apple Edition)

    Forty years ago today, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, and Ronald Wayne founded what became Apple, Inc. Today, the Apple brand is considered the world’s most valuable, worth close to $120 billion.

    And now…The Mash!

    We begin in Fort Worth, where fans of Louis Torres’s “beer can house” have just days to get a last look at it. Torres sold the house, which is likely to be leveled by developers.

    A federal appeals court in Cincinnati ruled that Anheuser-Busch InBev can sell beer with up to 0.03 percent less alcohol than advertised and still be in compliance with the law.

    The World of Beer chain of beers is taking expansion to a new level. It has granted a franchise to Chinese investors, who plan to open three locations in Shanghai.

    According to the UK’s Local Government Association, one way of curbing alcohol abuse is to make lower-alcohol beverages—i.e., beer—more widely available to drinkers.

    Neal Ungerleider of Fast Company magazine reports on the status of Stone Brewing Company’s brewery in Berlin, and Stone’s effort to sell IPA to Germany’s conservative beer drinkers.

    A couch potato’s dream happened in I-95 in Melbourne, Florida. A semi-trailer carrying Busch beer slammed into the back of another truck loaded with Frito-Lay products.

    Finally, the owner of a Belgian beer bar in Philadelphia had these words for those who carried out the terror attacks in Brussels: “Heaven is an afterlife of Belgian beers, chocolates and frietjes that the terrorists shall never know.”

    The Friday Mash (Gangland Edition)

    Eighty years ago today, organized crime kingpin Dutch Schultz and three other men were fatally shot at a saloon in Newark, New Jersey, in what became known as “The Chophouse Massacre.”

    And now….The Mash! 

    We begin in England, where Cheltenham Racecourse has teamed up with Arkell’s Brewery to brew a beer honoring a famous racehorse named Arkle, whose daily diet included two bottles of Guinness.

    This fall, Pawtucket, Rhode Island-based Foolproof Brewing Company is bucking the trend by adding peanut butter to its Raincloud Robust Porter. It’s “as far as you can get” from pumpkin ale.

    Niraj Dawar and Charan K. Bagga have put together a graph that illustrates the branding power of the combined Anheuser-Busch-InBev SAB Miller mega-brewing company.

    Congressman Peter DeFazio offers yet another reason to drink American craft beer. The Oregon Democrat contends that buying local craft products helps reduce the nation’s balance-of-trade deficit.

    “No forests, no beer”, says Matt Miller of the Nature Conservancy. Forests are the home of headwaters streams, where most of the nation’s water supply originates.

    Beer, always been a part of Cincinnati’s culture, has enjoyed a renaissance in recent years. Garin Pirnia of Paste magazine offers a comprehensive beer traveler’s guide to the Queen City.

    Finally, the Kansas City Chiefs will reward 800 season-ticket holders who are flying to London to see their team play Detroit on November 1. The Chiefs have rented a pub, and will serve free beer Friday afternoon.

    The Friday Mash (Czech Republic Edition)

    On this day in 1918, Czechoslovakia came into existence. Since 1993, after the “Velvet Divorce” from Slovakia, the country is known as the Czech Republic. Different name, but the same great beer.

    And now….The Mash!

    We begin in New Jersey, the only state that bars amusement games in bars. Lawmakers are considering the “Dave & Busters Bill,” which would repeal the 55-year-old law.

    Bad news for microbreweries: beer drinkers in their 20s are gravitating toward craft beer. The number one reason is that this age group is bored with the taste of mass-market brews.

    They’ve risen from the dead. Schlitz, Narragansett, and four other “zombie” beers are back from “Pabst purgatory”. Interestingly, three of the six are from Greater Cincinnati.

    Not everybody loves session beer. Esquire magazine’s Aaron Goldfarb thinks the idea is dumb. He insists there’s a reason why you don’t see session bourbon or session wine in stores.

    Skol’s new Beats Senses beer comes in a deep-blue-colored bottle, and a Brazilian agency decided the best way to advertise it was to film a commercial underwater–which wasn’t easy.

    Royal Caribbean’s Quantum of the Seas features the first-ever sea-going gastropub. It will serve a variety of American craft beers, which are still hard to find aboard cruise ships.

    Finally, Joe Maddon impressed sportswriters at his first press conference as the Chicago Cubs’ new manager. He held it the The CubbyBear, a ballpark bar, and treated the writers to a shot and a beer.

    The Friday Mash (Istanbul Not Constantinople Edition)

    The Four Lads once asked the musical question, “Why did Constantinople get the works?” Their answer: “It’s nobody’s business but the Turks’” Eighty-four years ago today, the Turks changed the city’s name to Istanbul. They also changed the name of their capital to Ankara.

    And now….The Mash!

    We begin in Cincinnati, where Listerman Brewing Company is hosting Starkbierfest, a family-friendly version of Munich’s Lenten tradition where potent doppelbock takes center stage.

    Yards Brewing Company is brewing a special beer for the popular TV show “Walking Dead.” No humans have been eaten in the brewing process, which involves smoking goat brains.

    Colorado governor John Hickenlooper has installed craft beer taps at his official residence. The first keg he tapped was Silverback Pale from Wynkoop Brewing Company, which he founded.

    Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery. Fortune magazine writers tried MillerCoors’s new Fortune beer and gave it a thumbs-up–and not just for its name.

    While visiting Belgium, Jay Brooks discovered a new organization, the Belgian Family Brewers. Its members have been brewing for at least 50 years, and have been family-owned all that time.

    Purists are up in arms about it, but three Seattle-area homebrewers have developed the PicoBrew Zymatic, a “set-and-forget” system that can be controlled from one’s laptop.

    Finally, Florida craft brewers learned that campaign cash trumps free enterprise. The State Senate president admitted that he’s against legalizing half-gallon growlers because a big beer distributor is a major contributor to his party.

    Cincinnati: A Mecca for Beer Tourists?

    People visit the Napa Valley to taste wine, and travel to Kentucky to taste bourbon. Now Cincinnati hopes to draw beer tourists to the Over-the-Rhine Historic District. OTR, as locals call it, was founded by German immigrants in the 19th century. The neighborhood recently fell upon hard times, but gentrification is taking place.

    Now a non-profit is trying to turn OTR’s Brewery District, where 18 large breweries once operated, into a tourist attraction. Three new breweries have already opened. One of them, Rhinegeist, has opened a taproom in what used to be part of the old Christian Moerlein complex. As for Christian Moerlein, the brand name is now owned by entrepreneur Greg Hardman, whose brewery not only has a taproom but plans to add a multimillion-dollar tour facility.

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