Craft breweries

Beer…By the Numbers

  • Number of beers ordered by Bristol Motor Speedway for last Saturday’s Tennessee-Virginia Tech game: 545,000.
  • Attendance at that game: 156,990.
  • Ohio’s brewery count: 180.
  • Percent of Ohio breweries that intend to make 12-percent-plus beer now that the ABV cap has been lifted: 10.
  • Increase in 2016 craft beer sales over 2015 sales: 6 percent (compared to 19 percent the year before).
  • Percentage of top-ten craft breweries with lower sales this year than last: 50.
  • Decline in Samuel Adams Boston Lager sales from 2015 to this year: 13.8.
  • Tsingtao Brewery Company’s net income in the first half of 2016: 1.07 billion yuan ($160 million).
  • Change from the first half of 2015: Down 11 percent.
  • Number of tickets Toppling Goliath brewery issued for its Mornin’ Delight imperial stout: 500.
  • Number of people who logged onto Toppling Goliath’s website to buy Mornin’ Delight tickets: 80,000.
  • Average annual salary for assistant brewers at small breweries: $30,000-$40,000.
  • Average annual salary for head brewers at small breweries: $35,000-$47,000.
  • Style categories in this year’s Great American Beer Festival competition: 96.
  • Breweries expected to compete in this year’s GABF: 1,600.
  • Beer…By the Numbers

  • Percent of American adults who drink alcohol: 65.
  • Percent of American drinkers whose favorite beverage is beer: 43.
  • Percent whose favorite beverage is wine: 32.
  • Craft breweries’ share of the U.S. beer market: 7.8 percent.
  • Craft breweries’ share of malt used by U.S. breweries: 25 percent.
  • Number of Americans who brew their own beer: about 1.2 million.
  • Estimated annual production of home-brewed beer: more than 2 million.
  • Homebrewed beer’s portion of U.S. beer production: 1 percent.
  • Attendance at this year’s Belgrade Beer Festival: 480,000.
  • Beers served at this year’s Belgrade Beer Festival: 100.
  • Number of beer stands at this year’s Minnesota State Fair: 20.
  • Cost of a 12-ounce craft beer at the fair: $3.50-$6.
  • Cost of a 20-ounce craft beer at the fair: $6-$8.
  • Years since the first AleFest Dayton: 18.
  • Number of beers at this year’s AleFest Dayton: 430.
  • The Friday Mash (PG-13 Edition)

    On this day in 1984, the Motion Picture Association of America added “PG-13” to its film rating system. The new rating was created after parents and advocacy groups complained about the amount of violence in some PG-rated films.

    And now…The Mash!

    We begin in South Carolina, where a 20-year-old law forbids breweries to donate beer to non-profit organizations. This law—which state liquor agents are aggressively enforcing—effectively prevents small breweries from taking part in festivals.

    In Las Vegas, Pub 365 plans to offer a rotating selection of 365 craft beers, including beer cocktails and a rare beer menu called the Unicorn List. Seasonals will make up one-fifth of the selection.

    Market Watch’s Jason Notte writes that craft breweries are resorting to a tactic they once despised: establishing sub-brands for beers that may not fit the character of the brewery’s core business.

    Starting next year, beer bikes will be banned from Amsterdam’s city center. Locals complained that the bikes, packed with bachelor partiers, have turned downtown into a drunken theme park.

    The Washington Post’s Fritz Hahn has noticed a trend: the 16-ounce shaker pint is giving way to smaller glassware. It’s makes craft beer appear cheape, and it’s a more responsible way to serve high-gravity styles.

    Thieves made off with two refrigerated trailers packed with 78,500 bottles of SweetWater Brewing Company’s beer. Police recovered some of the beer in a nearby warehouse—which, ironically, was a shooting location for the 1977 bootleg beer classic, Smokey and the Bandit.

    Finally, Untappd, Inc., now offers “Untapped For Business”, which allows retailers to publish beer lists, share their menus with consumers, and notify customers that rare or sought-after beers are going to appear on store shelves.

    The Friday Mash (Casey at the Bat Edition)

    On this day in 1888, the poem “Casey at the Bat” was first published in the San Francisco Examiner. You probaby remember that the mighty but overconfident Casey let two pitches go by for strikes before swinging at—and missing—the third strike, which led to “no joy in Mudville”.

    And now…Play Ball!

    We begin in Cleveland, where the Indians recently staged a “$2 Beer Night”. One creative group of fans built a 112-can, 11-level-high “beer-a-mid”. Major League Baseball offered a one-word comment: “Wow”.

    In Madison, Wisconsin, the Black Marigold wind ensemble commissioned composer Brian DuFord to write a suite of movements inspired by the area’s craft beers. One local craft will brew a special beer for Black Marigold.

    SodaStream, which sells machines that carbonate water, now offers an instant-homebrew device called the Beer Bar. Adding a package of “Blondie” concentrate to sparkling water produces a three-liter batch of 4.5-percent ABV.

    Talk about a hasty departure. A driver in China’s Henan Province was caught on video chugging a beer at the wheel—this, while dragging his IV drip outside the car with him.

    Here’s a new way to evade open container laws. A new invention called the Lolo Lid snaps onto the top of your can of beer, which you can then insert into a medium or large-sized paper coffee cup.

    A Boston Globe editorial called on state lawmakers to make it easier for small breweries to terminate their agreements with distributors. North Carolina passed similar legislation in 2012.

    Finally, the High Heel Brewing Company has come under fire for naming one of its beers after a shoe style and using pink and purple in its packaging. CEO Kristi McGuire said in her brewery’s defense, “We didn’t want to make a gimmick…We didn’t make the beer pink.”

    The Friday Mash (Boomer Sooner Edition)

    One hundred and twenty-five years ago today, at high noon, thousands of people took part in the Oklahoma Land Rush. Within hours, Oklahoma City and Guthrie had instant populations of 10,000.

    And now…The Mash!

    We begin in Tumwater, Washington, once the home of Olympia Brewing Company. Today, it’s the home of a cluster of legal marijuana growers and processors—including one of the state’s largest.

    Peru’s Cerveza San Juan beer brand has replaced the roaring jaguar with barnyard animals on its cans. The reason? The brewery is calling attention to the big cat’s endangered status.

    Officials have reinstated beer at the University of Missouri’s “Tiger Prowl”, where graduating seniors eat barbecue, get free merchandise, and get ready to say goodbye to their classmates.

    Anheuser-Busch InBev has acquired its eighth craft brewery, Devil’s Backbone of Roseland, Virginia. Established in 2008, Devil’s Backbone has won multiple Great American Beer Festival medals.

    The Vietnamese love beer, and craft brewers have begun to enter the market. One new craft is the Pasteur Street Brewing Company, whose founders include Vick’s Florida native John Reid.

    Forbes magazine’s Tara Nurin explores “pay-to-play” in beer distribution. Even after a high-profile crackdown in Massachusetts, she says it’s “a common yet whispered business practice”.

    Finally, Don Russell aka Joe Sixpack takes us back to the bad old days of Prohibition’s “needle beer”: speakeasy owners injected alcohol into near beer—which was still legal in the 1920s. One customer, who sampled the stuff, compared it to 44-D cough syrup.

    Beer…By the Numbers

  • Breweries operating in the United States as of June 30: 3,040.
  • Breweries in planning in the U.S. as of June 30: 1,929.
  • Workers employed by American craft breweries: 110,273.
  • Cost of one (legal) marijuana joint in Washington State: $2.71.
  • Cost of one bottle of Bud Light in Washington State: $0.90.
  • Most overpriced beer in the National Football League: $8.50 (53 cents an ounce) at Ford Field, Detroit.
  • Average cost of a bottle of beer at a Detroit-area grocery store: 98 cents (8.2 cents an ounce).
  • Football Bowl Subdivision (Division I-A) colleges that sell beer in on-campus stadiums: 21.
  • Publicly-owned stadiums that sell beer at FBS games: 11.
  • U.S. craft-beer exports in 2009: 46,000 barrels.
  • U.S. craft-beer exports in 2013: 282,500 barrels (about $73 million worth).
  • Number of beer tents at this year’s Oktoberfest in Munich: 14.
  • Capacity of the Schottenhamel beer tent, Oktoberfest’s largest: 10,000.
  • Nepal’s annual beer sales: 84 million bottles.
  • Number of breweries in Nepal: 6.
  • Beer…By the Numbers

  • Beers entered in this year’s National Homebrewers Competition: 8,172.
  • Increase over last year: 45 percent.
  • Craft breweries in Texas: 98.
  • Their production (including Spoetzl Brewing Company) in 2013: 833,191 barrels.
  • Increase over the year before: 17.3 percent.
  • Full Sail Brewing Company (Hood River, Oregon) production in 2013: 115,000 barrels.
  • States where Full Sail products are distributed: 31.
  • Alcoholic content of Dogfish Head 120 Minute IPA: 18 percent ABV.
  • Average retail price of a bottle of 120 Minute IPA: $8.
  • Strains stored in Britain’s National Collection of Yeast Cultures: more than 4,000.
  • Brewing yeast strains at the National Collection: 800.
  • Breweries represented at the first Colorado Brewers’ Festival in Fort Collins in 1990: 11.
  • Breweries represented at this year’s festival: more than 50.
  • Percent of underage drinkers who admit to binge-drinking: 44.
  • Percent of underage drinkers who binge-drink Bud Light: 13.5.
  • Beer…By the Numbers

  • Breweries operating in the U.S. at the end of June 2013: 2,538 (98 percent of which are craft breweries).
  • Breweries in planning at the end of June 2013: 1,605.
  • People employed by craft breweries: 108,440.
  • Low-end beer’s share of the Chinese market: 85 percent.
  • Cost of a bottle of Tsingtao beer in Beijing: $0.32 U.S.
  • Cost of a bottle of Budweiser in Beijing: $0.96 U.S.
  • SAB Miller’s share of Colombia’s beer market: 98 percent.
  • Its share of Peru’s beer market: 94 percent.
  • American Homebrewers Association membership as of June 30: 38,347.
  • Percent increase over last year: 16.2.
  • India pale ales entered in last year’s Great American Beer Festival: 203 (the number-one category in number of entries).
  • Imperial IPAs entered last year: 128 (the number-two category).
  • Alcohol’s current share of America’s food budget: 13 percent.
  • Alcohol’s lowest share of America’s food budget since 1890: 5 percent, during the early years of Prohibition.
  • Its highest share since 1890: 20 percent, during the early 1890s.
  • Beer…By the Numbers

  • Days until Christmas: 4.
  • Craft seasonal beer sales: $70.8 million.
  • Christmas/New Year’s rank for amount of beer sold: 5th.
  • Biggest day of the year for beer sales: July 4.
  • Cases of beer sold on July 4: 68.3 million.
  • Average price of beer in China: 33 cents (U.S.) per liter.
  • Average price of beer in Australia: $2.40 per liter.
  • Price of a beer from Lost Abbey’s upcoming “Box Set”: $40 per liter ($15 for a 375ml bottle).
  • U.S. breweries opening in October and November 2011: 58.
  • Breweries in planning as of November 30: 855.
  • Draft beer’s share of craft brewery sales: 30 percent.
  • Draft beer’s share of macrobrewery sales: 10 percent.
  • Craft beer brands sold in the United States: 13,000.
  • Craft beer brands sold in cans: About 400.
  • Craft breweries that can their beer: 144.
  • What’s Brewing in Japan?

    A trip to a Tokyo beer bar reminded Mark Garrison, who writes for Slate.com, that “Japan’s craft beer is “little known globally, but alarmingly good.” Not only are the country’s micros–which weren’t legal until 1994–turning out high-quality versions of popular European and American styles, but many of them are also experimenting with Japanese flavors such as ginger, yuzu, or even fist-sized Uramura oysters.

    Garrison also uncovered a major cultural difference between Japanese micros and those here in the States:

    American craft beer has roots in home brewing. Scratch the surface of many successful American craft brewers, and you’ll uncover early horror stories of batches lost to infection and weeks of work and money literally gone down the drain. But in Japan, most craft beer is made by sake brewers, with full command of sanitation, fermentation, bottling, and aging.

    Because it got off to a late start, Japan’s beer culture is, by Garrison’s estimation, about 15 years behind America’s. Craft beer lovers outside major cities get their beer through a combination of mail ordering, festivals, and brewery visits.

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