CraftBeer.com

The Friday Mash (Old School Edition)

On this day in 1364, Jagiellonian University was established in Krakow, Poland; and on this day in 1551, the National University of San Marcos, the oldest in the Americas, was established in Lima, Peru.

And now…The Mash!

We begin in Rochester, New York, where Genesee Brewing Company, which is undergoing a $49 million expansion, plans to transport 12 fermentation tanks via the Erie Canal. The tanks are too big to transport by highway or by rail.

It’s baseball season, and CraftBeer.com would like to introduce you to seven beers brewed especially for minor-league teams. Enjoy them with your peanuts and Cracker Jack.

Think you can’t sing? Organizers of the Twin Cities Beer Choir want to convince you otherwise. You buy the beer, and the Choir provide you with sheet music and plenty of friends.

An Indiana gas station owner found a clever loophole to the state’s ban on selling cold beer at convenience stores. He instal

The Friday Mash (“Sell High” Edition)

On this day in 2000, the Nasdaq Composite stock market index peaked at 5132.52, thanks to investors who bid up dot.com shares to astronomically high prices. Those who didn’t take profits got a nasty surprise: the Nasdaq fell by more than 50 percent by year’s end.

And now….The Mash!

Fittingly, we begin on Wall Street, where big breweries’ stocks haven’t been doing well. According to SeekingAlpha.com, the only company whose shares are trading near their 52-week high is Kirin Holdings Company.

Congress is considering a bill that would cut taxes for small brewers. The bill’s supporters contend that lower taxes would enable breweries to expand production, add jobs, and attract more visitors.

Session IPA is popular, but opinions vary as to its definition. Draft magazine has published a scale which shows how much these IPAs vary in alcoholic strength and, especially, perceived bitterness.

A few years ago, Emily Hengstebeck and her friends partied together at beer festivals. Now employed by a brewery, she found herself on the other side of the table. She describes what it’s like.

More than 7,000 CraftBeer.com readers filled out a survey asking them what was their state’s favorite beer bar, and why they liked it. Without further ado, here are the winners in each state.

It’s still “Miller Time” in Chicago. According to BevSpot, Miller has a more than 8-percent market share in the Windy City, more than twice the brand’s market share nationwide.

Finally, a Virginia brewery will release a beer honoring Secretariat, the 1973 Triple Crown winner, at a birthday celebration this month. The horse was nicknamed “Big Red”; the beer is an imperial red India pale ale.

Looking Ahead to 2016

Julia Herz of CraftBeer.com asked state brewers’ guild executives what craft beer lovers can look forward to in 2016. The trends they mentioned include session, lager and “easy drinking” beers; the revival of classic styles, some of them in barrel-aged versions; and “farm-to-keg” brewing.

Several guild executives mentioned beer festivals. Phil Platt of Minnesota Craft Brewers expects to see more “festivals in a box”: “festivals (from out of town) with a formulaic approach to their events…but no real connection to the local community.” Rob Caputo of The Brewers of Indiana Guild agrees with Platt. He also points out that proceeds from traveling festivals don’t necessarily stay in the community, and urges festival-goers to choose events that directly benefit local organizations.

In a similar vein, Paul Leone of the New York State Brewers Association warns of “festival fatigue,” saying “[p]eople will grow tired of uninformed volunteers pouring samples, and gravitate towards festivals where the brewers pour the beer.”

The Friday Mash (GW Bridge Edition)

On this day in 1931, the George Washington Bridge opened to traffic. This double-decker span over the Hudson River connects Manhattan with Fort Lee, New Jersey–a town now famous thanks to “Bridgegate.”

And now….The Mash!

We begin in Kansas City, where Boulevard Brewing Company will kick off its 25th anniversary celebration with the release of a special ale brewed in collaboration with Odell Brewing Company.

Chef David Chang made enemies thanks to a GQ magazine article declaring his hatred of “fancy beer”. Chang contends that craft beer has too intense a flavor to pair with his food.

Two hundred years ago, in London, eight women and children were killed by a flood of beer caused by an explosion at the Henry Meux & Company brewery. The disaster was ruled an “act of God.”

Why not turn your Halloween jack-o-lantern into a beer keg? All you need is a carving knife, a pumpkin carving kit, a Sharpie, a spigot, and beer—which need not be pumpkin beer.

William Bostwick, the Wall Street Journal’s beer critic, has written a book titled The Brewer’s Tale. In her review, Amy Stewart calls Bostwick “the very best sort of literary drinking buddy.”

In Papua New Guinea, which suffers 1.8 million cases of malaria every year, a brewery packs its beer in a box that contains eucalyptus, a natural mosquito repellent.

Finally, should the Great American Beer Festival give medals for best beer puns? CraftBeer.com’s Atalie Rhodes found these doozies on the list of medal winners. Our favorite is “Dubbel Entendre.”

Great American Beer Bars

The votes have been counted in the annual “Great American Beer Bars” competition, and the five regional winners, announced earlier this week on the Brewers Association’s CraftBeer.com site, are:

  • The Bier Stein (Eugene, Oregon), which serves more than 1,000 different beers in bottles and cans and always has 30 rotating beers on draft.
  • Cloverleaf Tavern (Caldwell, New Jersey), where “it’s easy to become lost among the beers on tap and the selection of over 65 bottled beers.”
  • Falling Rock Tap House (Denver, Colorado), which specializes in draft beers and is the unofficial after-hours headquarters of the Great American Beer Festival®.
  • HopCat (Grand Rapids, Michigan), which has 48 draft beers at all times, about half of which are brewed in Michigan.
  • Mekong Restaurant (Richmond, Virginia), a three-time winner, which has more than 50 draft beers and over 200 bottle offerings.
  • Ludwig offers his congratulations to these fine establishments.

    The Friday Mash (America’s Cup Edition)

    On this day in 1851, the first America’s Cup was won by—you guessed it—the yacht America. The “Auld Mug” is currently in the possession of Larry Ellison’s Team Oracle, which will defend it in 2017. That’s quite a ways off, so Ludwig suggests that you pass the time by filling your mug.

    And now…The Mash!

    We begin in Oslo where, according according to GoEuro’s researchers, a 12-ounce bottle of beer costs $4.50–more than four times what you’d pay in Dublin or Warsaw.

    Craft beer is so popular in Michigan that the State Police created a fake brewery, with “microbrews” like “Responsible Red” and “Designated Driver Dark,” as part of their latest anti-drunk driving campaign.

    The Golden State Warriors’ Stephen Curry is 26 years old and one of the NBA’s top players, but he still got carded at the local California Pizza Kitchen. Many of us share your pain, Steph.

    You might prefer a beer brand because of marketing, not because it tastes better. Participants in a recent blind taste test were only slightly better than random at distinguishing among popular lagers.

    Men’s Journal magazine has compiled the ten best beer commercials, starring, among others, The Most Interesting Man in the World, the Budweiser Clydsedales, and the Red Stripe Ambassador of Wisdom.

    The polls are open at CraftBeer.com’s annual Great American Beer Bars competition. Voters are asked to choose one establishment from ten nominees in five regions of the country.

    Finally, it’s a Great British Beer Festival tradition to show up in costume, like the gent with a Viking hat, those guys dressed up as priests, and a man who came as Prince Harry…Wait a minute, that was Prince Harry!

    The Friday Mash (Cream City Edition)

    On this day in 1846, Juneautown and Kilbourntown, Wisconsin, combined to form the city of Milwaukee. One of Milwaukee’s nicknames is “Cream City,” given in the late 19th century when millions of cream-colored bricks were made there.

    And now…The Mash!

    We begin in Northlake, Illinois, where Bill Diamond, a train conductor at a distribution plant, is protecting beer from the polar vortex, which has driven temperatures well below beer’s freezing point.

    Ever heard of the Andy-Oza Line? Created by Andy Sparhawk of CraftBeer.com, it’s the average ABV of the beer on tap at your local beer bar, divided by 5.9%, the average ABV of American craft beer.

    These cases are getting more common. Illinois’ Rockford Brewing Company filed a trademark suit against Michigan’s Rockford Brewing Company. Both claim to they were the first to use the name.

    Beer, then whiskey. MillerCoors is rolling out Miller Fortune, a golden lager that gives off a taste of bourbon. It’s aimed at 21- to 27-year-old men, who have gravitated to spirits in recent years.

    Heretic Brewing Company responded to California’s new growler law by providing customers with the most detailed instructions we’ve ever seen for keeping growlers clean.

    What did James Grant, a New Zealand doctor, do when a shark attacked him? He drove off the shark with a knife, stitched up his wounds, and went to the pub for a beer with his friends.

    Finally, umami is a savory flavor at the heart of Japanese food. Now there’s a beer to pair with it. It’s called Wazen, which will be released this spring by Suntory, the Japanese beverage company.

    The Winners: America’s Top Beer Bars

    The results are in. Nearly 30,000 people voted for America’s top beer bar, a competition sponsored by the Brewers Association’s CraftBeer.com. The overall winner was Mekong Restaurant in Richmond, Virginia. HopCat in Grand Rapids, Michigan, was the runner-up, and The Thirsty Monk in Asheville, North Carolina, finished third.

    Support Your Local Brewery

    Beer and politics have been inseparable at least as far back as the Code of Hammurabi, and all politics is local. This is where you come in. The Brewers Association has created a “Support Your Local Brewery,” which mobilizes craft brewers, and those who enjoy their products, when a legislative issue affecting small brewers comes up. So far this year, SYLB has been mobilized 24 times in eight states to speak out on legislation affecting small brewers.

    More information about SYLB can be found on the Brewers Association’s website.

    Lights! Camera! Craft Beer!

    CraftBeer.com, which went live last November, has more than 20 videos (and that number is growing) about craft brewing.

    One of our favorites is about the Craft Beer Class of 1996:

    The videos are free, but you’ll have to buy your own beer and pop your own popcorn.

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