Goose Island Beer Company

Beer…By the Numbers

  • Asia’s per capita beer consumption in 2016: 57 liters.
  • India’s per capita beer consumption in 2016: 4.7 liters.
  • India’s microbrewery count in 2016: 80.
  • Its microbrewery count in 2008: 2.
  • Boston Beer Company’s net revenue in 2016: $687 million (down 8 percent from 2015).
  • Boston Beer Company’s share price on January 27, 2017: $153.85.
  • Its share price two years ago: $320.83.
  • Lagunitas Brewing Company’s current annual production at its Chicago brewery: 405,000 barrels.
  • Its projected annual production after planned expansion: 1.2 million barrels.
  • Goose Island Beer Company’s annual production (estimated): 480,000 barrels.
  • Chicago breweries’ combined annual production (estimated): 1.115 million barrels.
  • MillerCoors’s sales in Wisconsin, 2012-16: 38.2 million barrels (biggest seller in Wisconsin).
  • Mark Anthony Brewing Company’s (Mike’s Hard Lemonade) sales in Wisconsin, 2012-16: 3.3 million barrels (second-biggest seller in Wisconsin).
  • Alcoholic strength of Founders Centennial IPA: 7.2 percent ABV.
  • Alcoholic strength of Founders All Day IPA: 4.7 percent ABV.
  • Goose Island and the Domino Effect

    Five years ago, Goose Island Beer Company announced that it would be acquired by Anheuser-Busch InBev. John Hall, Goose Island’s founder, stayed on as an A-B InBev employee. He was put in charge of the company’s craft and import division. That division, now called High End, followed the Goose Island precedent and began buying craft breweries. There are now eight in High End’s portfolio.

    There was another member of the Hall family to Goose Island: John Hall’s son, Greg. He left Goose Island after the sale and opened Virtue Cider on a farm in Michigan. Demand for the cider overwhelmed Virtue’s inefficient packaging equipment. Greg Hall wound up selling a controlling stake in Virtue to A-B InBev. The deal also allows Virtue to save on capital expenses; it uses Goose Island’s bottling and kegging operation in Chicago and thus doesn’t have to buy its own equipment.

    Jason Notte of Marketwatch.com recently spoke with the Halls just a few weeks before the fifth anniversary of the Goose Island sale and discussed “life afterward, the changes that have occurred in both the craft beer and cider markets since and what the sale meant to Virtue Cider and other A-B InBev High End offerings”. The interview is on the lengthy side, but definitely worth reading

    The Friday Mash (Thriller Edition)

    Thirty years ago today, Epic Records released Michael Jackson’s Thriller, the biggest-selling album in history. It was a pioneer in using music videos as a promotional tool, and seven singles from the album reached Billboard’s top ten. If you’re thinking, “hey, wrong Michael Jackson!”, you’re our kind of blog reader.

    And now….The Mash!

    We begin in Cincinnati’s Over-the-Rhine district, where Christian Moerlein beer will be brewed in a 19th-century brewery building. Before Prohibition, Christian Moerlein was Ohio’s largest-selling brand.

    Ry Beville’s love of craft beer has developed into an occupation. Beville, a native of Virginia, publishes Japan’s only bilingual craft beer magazine, the Japan Beer Times.

    John Hall is stepping down as CEO of Goose Island Beer Company, along with COO and founding member Tony Bowker. The Chicago-based brewery will continue to brew Goose Island’s “Vintage Series.”

    Deb Carey, the president of New Glarus Brewing Company, was invited to the White House to discuss small business-related issues. She traded beer with the president: two bottles of her Serendipity ale for three bottles of White House Honey Ale.

    Can you get a couple of sixers in Iraq? Yes, provided you find a shopkeeper who sells it “under the counter”…and leave the store before attracting attention.

    Rogue Ales is rolling out a “novel” beer: White Whale Ale, made with a few pages from a copy of Moby Dick. The beer, an IPA, honors Portland, Oregon, bookseller Michael Powell.

    Finally, tomorrow is Zwanze Day. Thirty-six select locations around the world–16 in the U.S.–will be pouring Cantillon Zwanze, a rhubarb lambic.

    The Friday Mash (Frosty Cold One Edition)

    Here in Michigan, we’ve had a series of cold nights, some of them punctuated by frost and freeze warnings. But it won’t be long before May brings us sunshine, flowers, and best of all, the first Maibocks of the year. We can hardly wait.

    And now…The Mash!

    Athens, Georgia, is famous for the University of Georgia Bulldogs, the B-52s, and now, the Terrapin Beer Company. John Cochran, co-founder of Terrapin, tells his story on CraftBeer.com.

    Beer for dinner? According to Clay Risen of The Atlantic, the idea is catching on. Risen singles out Goose Island Beer Company for the attractive labels it puts on its high-end brews.

    Jay, at Hedonist Beer Jive, donned his flame-proof jacket and named the five most boring topics in beer journalism. As you might have guessed, his column inspired some caustic commentary.

    The folks at the Beer School blog think it’s time to give India pale ale a new name.

    Yesterday, Paste magazine’s “List of the Day” focused on the best beer bars in America. Thirty establishments made the list, which is arranged by state. Writer Josh Jackson offered one criterion for a high-quality beer bar: “The bartender and waitstaff should be like record store clerks without the accompanying snobbery.”

    Finally, in case you missed it, yesterday was Earth Day. Noah Davis of DraftMag.com spotlighted three of the many breweries that are doing their part to help the planet.

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