Heineken

The Friday Mash (Boiling Point Edition)

On this day in 1743, Jean-Pierre Christin developed the Centigrade temperature scale, with 0 degrees representing water’s freezing point and 100 degrees its boiling point. However, the scale is named for Swedish astronomer Anders Celsius, who came up with a similar idea independently of Christin.

And now…The Mash!

We begin in Chicago, where the Lincoln Park Zoo is collaborating with DryHop Brewers on a new beer that will raise money for polar bears and raise awareness of climate change. The beer, Ursus Mapletimus, is a smoked maple imperial white ale.

Some years ago, a pub owner in England told Arthur Johnson that he’d get free beer for life if he lived to age 100. Johnson reached the century mark, and now he shows up every day for a pint.

Is there a beer without malt or hops? Yes. It’s an alcoholic ginger beer from Ginger’s Revenge, a new brewery in Asheville, North Carolina. The beer is also gluten-free.

Congratulations to Garrett Marrero and Melanie Oxley, who own the Maui Brewing Company. The U.S. Small Business Administration named them “National Small Business Persons of the Year.”

Heineken has launched a zero-alcohol version of its namesake beer. Alcohol-free beers are attractive to brewers because that segment of the market is growing, and beers without alcohol are taxed less heavily.

English heavy-metal band Iron Maiden is coming to the U.S. Also coming to America is Trooper, an award-winning ESB inspired by the band and brewed by Robinsons Brewery.

Finally, Breckenridge Brewing Company has announced the winner of its annual competition to name the official beer of Denver Comic Con. This year’s winner is “I Am Brewt,” a pun on the Guardians of the Galaxy superhero film series.

The Friday Mash (Spanish Inquisition Edition)

On this day in 1834, the Spanish parliament formally disbanded the Inquisition, which was created in 1480 by monarchs Ferdinand and Isabella. It was revived in 1970 by the Monty Python troupe—when no one was expecting it.

And now…The Mash!

We begin in Amsterdam, which is having a rainy summer. That’s good new for a group of entrepreneurs who are gathering rainwater and using to brew a pale ale called “Hemelswater: code blond”.

The newly-opened Tilted Mash Brewing got a big boost from judges at this year’s California State Fair. A third-place showing in the competitive Pale Ale category gave the brewery instant credibility.

Beer, then whiskey. Chicago’s Wander North Distillery is distilling beer mash from its next-door neighbor, Northgate Brewing. The first whiskey in the series is called Uncharted 1.

William Turton and Bryan Mengus of Gizmodo.com tried three popular brands of non-alcoholic beer. The best of the three “tasted like carbonated water with some beer flavoring thrown in”, the worst was “disgusting”.

Engineers at Heineken have discovered a way to dispense beer at high altitudes. Once the airline gets the necessary safety certificates, it will start serving in-flight draft beer.

How intense has beer trademark litigation gotten? Twelve lawyers filed challenges to Candace Moon’s application to trademark the phrase “Craft Beer Attorney”.

Finally, two IT consultants from Michigan have developed an app for beer festivals. It allows festival-goers to see what beers are available, develop a customized list, and rate the beers after tasting them.

Beer…By the Numbers

  • Craft beer production in 2015: 24.5 million barrels.
  • Increase over 2014: 13 percent.
  • Craft beer’s share of the market, as measured by production: 12 percent.
  • Its market share, as measured by dollar value: 21 percent ($22.3 billion).
  • Percentage of under-30 adults who said beer was their favorite beverage in 1992-93: 70.
  • Percentage of under-30 adults who said beer was their favorite beverage 20 years later: 40.
  • “Pay-for-play” fine imposed on distributor Craft Brewers Guild by Massachusetts liquor regulators: $2.6 million.
  • Craft Brewers Guild’s payoffs to bars and other businesses: At least $120,000.
  • Dollar value of Heineken’s U.S. sales during the 52 weeks ending January 24, 2016: $730.7 million.
  • Increase over the previous year: 1.9 percent.
  • Heineken’s share of the imported beer market: 13.1 percent (down 1.2 percent from the year before).
  • Years since Guinness opened its brewery at St James’s Gate in Dublin: 257.
  • Years remaining on Guinness’s lease for the St James’s Gate brewery: 8,743.
  • Flavored beers’ share of new beer releases in 2010: 15 percent.
  • Flavored beers’ share in 2015: 27 percent.
  • The Friday Mash (Wednesday Edition)

    It’s Thanksgiving weekend, which means that Ludwig, our beer-drinking lion, is spending quality time with his pride. His first stop is, of course, the Detroit Lions game at Ford Field. Then, after he and the other lions feast (on zebra and all the trimmings, of course), he’s going to take a long nap. He’ll be back next Friday with the regular edition of…

    The Mash! 

    We begin in Chelsea, Massachusetts, where The Field hosted its annual Pub Debate over whether marijuana should be legalized. The debate was conducted under British parliamentary rules, and both drinking and heckling were encouraged.

    Chris Bosh of the NBA’s Miami Heat hosted a block party for his neighborhood. Bosh, an avid homebrewer, included a growler of his beer with each invitation.

    Sierra Nevada Brewing Company has launched the Alpha Hops Society. For a $250 annual fee, members will receive a quarterly release of small-batch experimental brews.

    Last month’s mega-merger between Anheuser-Busch InBev and SABMiller has put midsize brands such as Carlsberg and Heineken in a squeeze between a goliath with one-third of the industry’s market share and a growing craft sector.

    The “Flux Capacitor” is back from the future. Treadwell Park, a beer hall in Manhattan has installed the device, which lets bartenders control the carbonation and temperature of each beer.

    Here’s evidence that beer pong can be educational. Alex, from QuickSolar.com, hosts a two-minute video in which he uses the game to explain the solar photovoltaic effect.

    Finally, beer, then whiskey. Rhonda Kallman, co-founder of the Boston Beer Company and a craft beer legend, has started a new venture, the Boston Harbor Distillery. It makes whiskey out of—you guessed it—Sam Adams beer.

    The Most Interesting Person You Never Heard Of

    The Most Interesting Man in the World has competition. Michel de Carvalho, the son of a Brazilian father and and a British mother, is an MBA from Harvard, a three-time Olympic competitor, and a high-ranking investment banker at Citigroup.

    So why is he being mentioned on this blog? Because he married Charlene Heineken, the only child of beer baron Freddy Heineken and 25-percent owner of Heineken International. Her shares make the couple worth an estimated $11 billion.

    Earlier this year, the brewery contacted Patricia Sellers of Fortune magazine, and proposed that she interview the de Carvalhos. Even though Charlene has been publicity-shy, she saw Heineken’s 150th birthday as an opportunity to talk about her life and her family business.

    One interesting story involves Anheuser-Busch. After Freddy Heineken died, August Busch III–the Busches and de Carvalhos were friendly rivals—suggested that the two companies help one other expand their distribution. A Heineken-Busch joint venture is one of the industry’s more intriguing historical “what-ifs.”

    In September, Charlene rejected an unsolicited bid by SABMiller. Meanwhile, Michel is trying to grow Heineken in a rapidly-consolidating industry. Michel feels the heavy responsibility that goes with being part of a family business. He said to Sellers, “One of the things that drives me is the thought that one guy [Freddy] is constantly looking down and wondering whether we’re going to **** it up.”

    The Friday Mash (Discovery Day Edition)

    On this day in 1492, Christopher Columbus became the first European to set foot on the island of Hispaniola. December is celebrated as Discovery Day on the island’s two countries, Haiti and the Dominican Republic.

    And now….The Mash!

    We begin in Loudoun County, Virginia, where beer tourism is stimulating the local economy. The county has eight breweries, with 16 more in the planning stages.

    Black Friday has become the number-one day for beer releases. As you’ve probably figured out, most of these beers are stouts and many of them are barrel-aged.

    SABMiller, the world’s second-largest brewing company, still lacks a global brand. Its launch of Pilsner Urquell was a flop, and Heineken said no to a takeover offer.

    Bottles and Cans, a liquor store in Chicago, is offering an adults-only Advent calendar. It contains 25 beers, each of them to be enjoyed on the weekdays leading up to Christmas.

    European Union officials want Japan to open its market to imported beers. Arcane Japanese rules, such as a ban on ingredients like coriander seeds, act as “non-tariff barriers.”

    Minnesota’s Excelsior Brewing Company has brewed a saison beer with pondweed and zebra mussels. The brewery insists that “minuscule” amounts of the invasive species were added.

    Finally, Shoes & Brews, a runners’ gear store in Colorado, offers an incentive to get into shape. The store, which has a liquor license and 20 taps, bases the price of your first beer on your time in an 800-meter time trial.

    Beer…By the Numbers

  • Alcoholic content of Guinness’ new Signature Series luxury beer: 9 percent ABV.
  • Cost of a 750-ml bottle of Signature Series: $34.99.
  • Anheuser-Busch InBev’s share of the world beer market: 29.6 percent.
  • Second-place Heineken’s share: 17.7 percent.
  • Average cost of a bottle of Bud in a bar: $3.75.
  • Average amount the bar pays for a bottle of Bud: 85 cents.
  • Vietnam’s annual beer consumption: 3 billion liters.
  • Its annual beer consumption per capita: 33.3 liters.
  • China’s current annual per capita beer consumption: 40 liters.
  • Its annual per capita beer consumption in 2001: 18 liters.
  • Average cost of a small draft beer at a National Hockey League arena this season: $7.45.
  • Cheapest beer in the NHL: 33 cents per ounce, Verizon Center, Washington.
  • Most expensive beer in the NHL: 61 cents (U.S.) per ounce, MTS Centre, Winnipeg.
  • Number of Liquor Control Board of Ontario stores: 639.
  • LCBO’s annual sales: C$5 billion (U.S. $4.5 billion).
  • Beer…By the Numbers

    • Worldwide Trappist brewery count: 10.
    • Trappist breweries’ annual production: 387,000 barrels.
    • Leading Trappist brand Chimay’s share of that total: 40 percent.
    • U.S. beer sales in 2013: 200 million barrels (down 1.4 percent from 2012).
    • U.S. craft beer sales in 2013: 14 million barrels (up 9.6 percent from 2012).
    • Average craft drinker’s annual spending on beer: $181 (11 trips to the store).
    • Average “economy beer” drinker’s annual spending on beer: $252 (18 trips to the store).
    • Cost of a six-pack of Heineken in Oklahoma City (cheapest among cities surveyed by NerdWallet.com): $7.33.
    • Cost of a six-pack of Heineken in Chicago (most expensive among cities surveyed): $12.99.
    • Brewery openings in Colorado in 2013: 57.
    • Colorado’s brewery count at the end of 2013: 217.
    • Anheuser-Busch InBev’s share price in March 2014: $103.75.
    • A-B InBev’s market capitalization in March 2014: $166.83 billion.
    • Cost of a ticket to Three Floyds’ annual Dark Lord Day: $30.
    • Number of tickets sold: 6,000.

    The Friday Mash (007 Edition)

    Fifty years ago today, Dr. No debuted. The first-ever James Bond film starred Sean Connery in the role of Agent 007, and Ursula Andress as the Bond Girl. The current James Bond is British actor Daniel Craig, who played him in Skyfall, as well as in this Heineken commercial.

    And now….The Mash!

    We begin in Kalamazoo, Michigan, which has become a destination for beer travelers. It’s the home of many microbreweries, brewpubs, and bars that specialize in Michigan-brewed beer.

    Does your choice of beer reveal your political leanings? A recent study suggests that it does. For instance, Heineken drinkers are Democrats, Samuel Adams drinkers Republicans.

    All in a day’s work. Jadrian Klinger of Harrisburg magazine accompanied beer blogger Jeff Kupko on a day of beer tasting. Kupko, who has reviewed some 1,800 beers, explained the finer points of beer appreciation.

    In Minneapolis, the Northbound Smokehouse & Brewpub used a novel strategy to raise capital: free beer for life for those who invested $1,000. Most of the “members,” as they’re called, live within walking distance.

    A new book by Jim Merkel got our attention. Titled “Beer, Brats and Baseball, it tells the story of how Germans shaped St. Louis.

    John Steinbeck never ate at a Red Robin restaurant, but he wrote about beer milkshakes, which are now on Red Robin’s menu. They’re mentioned in Chapter 17 of his 1945 novel, Cannery Row.

    Finally, “The Most Expensive Beer I Ever Had” award goes to Domagoj Vida, a Croatian soccer player. Vida was fined 100,000 euros ($130,000) after he was caught drinking a beer on the team bus en route to a match.

    Extreme Beer Traveling

    Justin Bratton, a Texas native who lives in Bangkok, performed an interesting social experiment. He traveled from Inner Mongolia to Thailand, a distance of 5,000 miles, with no money in his pocket. Instead, he paid with beer. Armed with dozens of bottles of Heineken, Bratton bartered for rides, information, and other travel essentials.

    Bratton’s modes of transportation included a sidecar with sheep in Mongolia, camels in China, and fruit carts in Vietnam, as well as boats and horses. His adventures, which were captured by a film crew that followed him, are being promoted in short web episodes on Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube.

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