Modelo Especial

Beer…By the Numbers

  • Participants in the 2016 American Homebrewers Association Big Brew event: more than 12,000.
  • Establishments that hosted Big Brew events in 2016: 483.
  • Cities on this year’s Sierra Nevada “Beer Camp on Tour”: 8.
  • Breweries collaborating with Sierra Nevada on this year’s event: 12.
  • Beer’s share of Boston Beer Company’s beverage production in 2010: 88.9 percent.
  • Its share of Boston Beer Company’s beverage production in 2016: 57.2 percent.
  • Twelve-ounce beers in a “keg” (half-barrel) of beer: 165.
  • Growlers in a keg: 31.
  • Beer stores in Whiteclay, Nebraska (population 9) last year: 4.
  • Beer stores in Whiteclay today: 0. Their licenses were revoked by the state.
  • Cans of beer sold in Whiteclay last year: 3.5 million. Most are bought by Native Americans living on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, which is dry.
  • Japan’s legal drinking age: 20.
  • Japanese brewing industry’s recommended minimum age for actors in beer commercials: 25.
  • Mexican beer’s share of the U.S. import beer market: 70 percent.
  • Mexican beers among the 7 top-selling brands in the U.S.: 2 (Corona Extra and Modelo Especial).
  • Beer…By the Numbers

  • Approximate number of homebrewers in the U.S.: 1.2 million.
  • Proportion of homebrewers who took up the hobby since 2001: About 2/3.
  • Increase in the average price of American beer since 2003: 42 percent.
  • Increase in the average price of American mixed drinks since 2003: 51 percent.
  • Barrels of Modelo Especial shipped to the U.S. in 2014: 4.5 million.
  • Increase over 2009: 128.4 percent.
  • U.S hop production in 2015: 39,400 tons.
  • Increase over 2014: 11 percent.
  • Estimated value of the 2015 crop: $345.4 million.
  • Clydesdale horses owned by Anheuser-Busch: 175.
  • Cost of feeding a Clydesdale: $500 a month.
  • Beer’s share of South Korea’s alcoholic beverage market: 53.3 percent.
  • Soju’s (a hard liquor) share of South Korea’s alcoholic beverage market: 28.1 percent.
  • Freezing point of beer: 27 degrees Fahrenheit.
  • Freezing point of ethanol: -170 degrees Fahrenheit.
  • The Friday Mash (Boxing Day Edition)

    Today is Boxing Day in Great Britain, Canada, much of the Commonwealth, and several countries in continental Europe. The origins of the name are unclear, but one thing is for certain: most people living in those countries get the day off from work. Cheers, everyone!

    And now….The Mash!

    Fittingly we begin in Canada, where Gerald Comeau is challenging the constitutionality of laws limiting how much alcohol one may bring across provincial lines. Comeau’s legal team thinks he has a good chance of winning.

    The Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board has approved home delivery of beer by food retailers. The maximum deliverable quantity is 192 ounces, and the beer must be paid for with a credit card while ordering.

    Russia’s economic woes could be bad news for beer drinkers. In an effort to keep bread affordable at home, President Vladimir Putin has slapped a tax on exports of barley and other grains.

    Jennifer Wiley, a University of Illinois scientist, has found that a person with a BAC near .08 reaches a creative peak because he or she is less able to over-think during a task. A new Danish beer aims to help drinkers reach that intellectual sweet spot.

    Dos Equis is America’s fastest-growing beer brand, thanks to ads featuring “the most interesting man in the world.” On the other hand, #2 brand Modelo Especial does very little advertising in English.

    Zane Lamprey, the host of National Geographic’s TV show “Chug”, has developed a “drinking jacket”. It has a “beer koozie” breast pocket, a zipper that doubles as a bottle opener, and slip-resistant drinking gloves. And it comes in four colors.

    Finally, Modern Farmer magazine answers your burning questions about beer-drinking donkeys. Heading the list: can donkeys get drunk? Answer: Yes*, but because they weigh more than 200 pounds, they require more than the average human.

    * Ludwig would like to state for the record that he drinks responsibly.

    Beer…By the Numbers

  • Breweries that will enter a beer in this year’s Great American Beer Festival competition: 1,360.
  • Increase over last year’s competition: 610 (81 percent).
  • Breweries that asked to pour beer at this year’s GABF: 822.
  • Number of breweries that can be accommodated at the GABF venue: 726 (including 96 tables for sponsors).
  • Craft beer’s share of the U.S. market in 1988: 2.6 percent.
  • Its share of the U.S. market in 2013: 8 percent.
  • Imported beer’s share of the U.S. market in 1988: 8.4 percent.
  • Its share of the U.S. market in 2013: 14 percent.
  • Corona Extra’s U.S. sales in 2013: 7.26 million barrels.
  • Modelo Especial’s U.S. sales in 2013: 3.6 million barrels.
  • U.S. annual per capita spending on beer: $356.20.
  • Canada’s annual per capita spending on beer: $351.89.
  • Australia’s annual per capita spending on beer: $747.90.
  • Percent of American men who say they can’t go an entire week without beer: 27.
  • Percent who say they can’t go an entire week without pizza: 31.
  • What Do Those Symbols on Beer Labels Mean?

    Breweries are among the oldest businesses in the world, and their beer labels are full of symbols from their storied histories. In MentalFloss.com, Nick Green explains the symbolism behind 20 well-known beer labels.

    One of the most common sources of symbols is the brewery’s own history. The eagle on the Yuengling label and the horn on Stella Artois’ harken back to the breweries’ original names. The hometown coat of arms is another source. That’s why there are lions on the Amstel and Modelo Especial labels, and a key on the Beck’s label. Dos Equis resurrected Aztec leader Moctezuma II for its label, and Guinness appropriated the Brian Boru harp.

    Green’s article has some other fun facts. Bass’s red triangle was issued Trademark #1 by the British government; until 1908, the text of the Budweiser label was in German; and legend has it that Miller High Life was called “The Champagne of Beers” because it was released a few days before New Year’s Eve.

    Finally, there’s Rolling Rock’s mysterious “33”. People have offered numerous explanations, but no one knows for sure how and why that number wound up on the label.

    The Friday Mash (Victory at Sea Edition)

    On this day in 1885, Chester Nimitz was born. Nimitz was Commander in Chief of the Pacific Fleet, and led the U.S. Navy to victory over Japan, in World War II. The best place to raise a glass to America’s last five-star admiral is at Oktoberfest in Nimitz’s hometown of Fredericksburg, Texas.

    And now…The Mash!

    We begin in Boston, where the makers of Samuel Adams beer are preparing a special 26.2 Brew for the Boston Marathon, which takes place Monday, April 16.

    In South Korea, the latest trend in licensed establishments is the self-service pub. Customers grab a table, select one of the 100 or so beers in the coolers, and settle their tab at the end of the night.

    It’s not too early to make summer travel plans. The Forbes Travel Guide has some suggestions: its list of top ten brewery tours worth a visit.

    The village of Melonsby, England, recently lost its mobile library, but the Black Bull Pub is trying to fill the void. It’s lending books to pub patrons, who can enjoy a book with their pint.

    What are the top three top-selling imported beers in the U.S.? The answer: (1) Corona, (2) Heineken, and (3) Modelo Especial. The latter brand has posted double-digit sales growth for the past 17 years.

    Curious about those bubbles in your beer? Don Russell, a/k/a Joe Sixpack, has 16 things to know about foam.

    Finally, Rob Dunn of Scientific American magazine, has written an intriguing blog post titled “Strong Medicine: Drinking Wine and Beer Can Help Save You from Cholera, Montezuma’s Revenge, E. Coli and Ulcers”.

    Imported From America

    It’s raged on for decades: the debate over whether it matters where a beer is brewed. During the 1970s, Anheuser-Busch filed a complaint with the government, accusing Miller Brewing company of not disclosing that Lowenbrau was brewed in Texas. Years later, Boston Beer Company ran into a storm of criticism after it contract-brewed Samuel Adams.

    The latest round in the debate nvolves several famous imports that are now brewed in the United States. Fosters,”Australian for beer,” is made in Texas; Red Stripe, “The Taste of Jamaica,” comes from La Crosse, Wisconsin; and Beck’s, whose label says “Bremen, Germany,” will soon be brewed in St. Louis. Why has production been moved to here? Several reasons: shipping costs are lower, brewers are less exposed to a falling dollar, and there’s excess brewing capacity in the States.

    But not everyone is jumping on the made-in-America trend. Heineken is readying an ad campaign that stresses its Amsterdam origin, and the brewers of brands such as Corona and Modelo Especial believe that Hispanics prefer beer that is brewed in Mexico.

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