per capita consumption

Beer…By the Numbers

  • Asia’s per capita beer consumption in 2016: 57 liters.
  • India’s per capita beer consumption in 2016: 4.7 liters.
  • India’s microbrewery count in 2016: 80.
  • Its microbrewery count in 2008: 2.
  • Boston Beer Company’s net revenue in 2016: $687 million (down 8 percent from 2015).
  • Boston Beer Company’s share price on January 27, 2017: $153.85.
  • Its share price two years ago: $320.83.
  • Lagunitas Brewing Company’s current annual production at its Chicago brewery: 405,000 barrels.
  • Its projected annual production after planned expansion: 1.2 million barrels.
  • Goose Island Beer Company’s annual production (estimated): 480,000 barrels.
  • Chicago breweries’ combined annual production (estimated): 1.115 million barrels.
  • MillerCoors’s sales in Wisconsin, 2012-16: 38.2 million barrels (biggest seller in Wisconsin).
  • Mark Anthony Brewing Company’s (Mike’s Hard Lemonade) sales in Wisconsin, 2012-16: 3.3 million barrels (second-biggest seller in Wisconsin).
  • Alcoholic strength of Founders Centennial IPA: 7.2 percent ABV.
  • Alcoholic strength of Founders All Day IPA: 4.7 percent ABV.
  • What Countries Drink the Most?

    At FiveThirtyEight.com, Mona Chalabi crunched the numbers from the World Health Organization to find out which countries are home to the biggest drinkers.

    The WHO data confirm some stereotypes; for example, France ranks number one in per capita wine consumption, with 370 servings per year. But there were big surprises, too. Namibia ranks first in beer consumption, with 376 servings per person per year—more than 10 percent higher than Germany; and Grenada tops the list of spirits-drinking countries, with 438 servings per person per year.

    Americans drink more beer—249 servings per person per year–than any other alcoholic beverage. However, American drinking preferences have fluctuated over the years. Grain shortages during World War II forced Americans to try rum from the Caribbean (fortunately, creative bartenders developed new cocktails such as the Hurricane); and after World War II, vodka became popular—and it remains the nation’s favorite hard liquor.

    As for beer, it was less popular during the 19th century because innovations such as refrigeration, bottles, and cans hadn’t come into wide use, and the beverage wasn’t as easy to transport and store as it is today.

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