The Friday Mash (National Geographic Edition)

On this day in 1888, the National Geographic Society was formed. The Society’s logo, a bright yellow box, appears on National Geographic magazine, which is published in 40 languages around the world.

And now…The Mash!

We begin in Pennsylvania, where the beer police caught up with Travis John Miller, who was selling the contents of his beer cellar on Craigslist. Miller faces a misdemeanor charge of selling alcohol without a license.

Swedish brewer Fredrik Tunedal, who often came home from work covered in malt dust, has released a Shower Beer. Its flavor profile includes a soapy taste, which Tunedal calls “on-point” for his product.

Keurig Green Mountain has partnered with Anheuser-Busch InBev to develop a line of instant beers—and other instant adult beverages—that Keurig owners can make at home.

The CEO of Constellation Brands, which imports Corona and Modelo beer, said that he doesn’t expect President-elect Donald Trump’s trade policy to raise the price of Mexican brands.

Despite a dismal 5-7 record, the University of Texas finished #1 in the country—in beer sales, that is. By season’s end, Longhorns fans spent $5.26 on alcohol for every fan in attendance.

Bart Watson, the Brewers Association’s chief economist, disputes studies showing that beer sales have fallen in states where recreational marijuana is legal. Watson argues that pot is just one of many variables affecting sales.

Finally, in Adelaide, Australia, the woman-owned Sparkke Change Beverage Company is putting feminist messages on cans of its beer. It’s an effort to start conversations in the country’s male-dominated beer culture.

Beer…By the Numbers

  • U.S. alcoholic beverage sales in 2013: $174 billion.
  • Beer’s share of U.S. alcoholic beverage sales: 48 percent (craft beer accounts for 7 percent, non-craft for 41 percent).
  • Spirits’ share of U.S. alcoholic beverage sales: 34 percent.
  • Dollar value of Bud Light (America’s #1 seller) sold in 2014: $5.95 billion.
  • Dollar value of Coors Light (America’s #2 seller) sold in 2014: $2.36 billion.
  • Dollar value of India pale ale sold in 2014: $547 million.
  • Increase in IPA sales between 2013 and 2014: 50 percent.
  • Increase in craft beer sales between 2013 and 2014: 20 percent.
  • Sweden’s brewery count: 145.
  • Its brewery count in 1988: 7.
  • San Diego County’s brewery count in 2014: 97 (up from 37 in 2011).
  • Brewing industry’s impact on San Diego County’s economy: $599.4 million (up from $299.5 million in 2011).
  • Beers served at last weekend’s Michigan Brewers Guild Winter Beer Festival: 1,035.
  • Breweries represented at that festival: 103.
  • Breweries represented at the Guild’s first Winter Beer Festival in 2006: 21.
  • The Friday Mash (Rebellion Edition)

    On this day in 1837, Canadian journalist and politician William Lyon Mackenzie wrote an essay calling for a rebellion against the United Kingdom. During the 1990s, the Upper Canada Brewing Company honored him with an ale called “Rebellion.”

    And now….The Mash!

    We begin in Hyde Park, Utah, whose heavily Mormon population voted nearly 2-to-1 to allow beer sales. The town’s mayor said it was the most emotional issue he’s ever seen.

    Spain’s Catalonia has its own language, customs, and cuisine. If brewery owner Alex Padro has its way, it will soon have its own beer as well.

    Sonoma County, California, the birthplace of modern craft brewing, boasts 20 craft breweries. The breweries have a significant economic impact, and have become a tourist attraction.

    Heady Topper, a double IPA made by The Alchemist brewery, is so popular that the brewery’s owners had to close their retail store after neighbors complained about rowdy customers.

    Patagonia, the outdoor clothing company, is celebrating its 40th anniversary with the California Route Lager. It’s a California common beer made by the New Belgium Brewing Company.

    Garrett Oliver talked with the New York Times about his favorite places to drink beer in Sweden. Oliver has teamed up with Carlsberg to start The New Carnegie Brewery in Stockholm.

    Finally, two men are raising funds on Kickstarter.com for The Beer Tusk, a device for those who like to “shotgun” their beers. It’s safer than a key, and less likely to make the beer backsplash.

    The Friday Mash (Feathered Friends Edition)

    On this day in 1785, John James Audubon was born. His major work is a color-plate book entitled The Birds of America. You might want to toast the great naturalist–or birds in general–with a Duck Duck Goose by Lost Abbey, one of the world’s top-rated beers.

    And now…The Mash!

    We begin in Minneapolis, where the city’s last “3.2 bars” cling to life. Craft beer, changes to liquor laws, and Minnesota’s indoor smoking ban are killing off these venerable establishments.

    Yuck! Student researchers at Clemson University examined balls used in beer pong games, and found them riddled with nasty germs including e.coli, salmonella, staph, and listeria.

    This week’s craft beer fun fact: India pale ale accounts for 25.2 percent of all beer sold in Oregon. That’s all beer, not all craft beer.

    Shane Battier of the defending NBA champion Miami Heat said that he has a pre-game ritual: downing a Bud Light. The brewery has rewarded his loyalty by presenting him with a truckload of the beer.

    In Sweden, the label for “Lust” beer ran afoul of regulators because it featured an anime image of a naked woman in a pool. It’s part of a “Seven Deadly Sins” beer series.

    BeerHunt will reward you for drinking beer. The app, described as “a kind of Foursquare for beer,” will give you points, and ultimately prizes, for drinking craft, rare, and exotic beers.

    Finally, an item from the Department of Acquired Tastes. A Japanese beer called Black Ivory Coffee is brewed from beans chewed up and pooped out by elephants. It’s style? A stout.

    The Friday Mash (O.K. Corral Edition)

    On this day in 1881, the most famous gunfight in Old West history took place at the O.K. Corral in Tombstone, Arizona. It was fought between outlaws Billy Clanton, Tom McLaury and his brother Frank; and lawmen Virgil Earp, his brothers Morgan and Wyatt, and temporary deputy Doc Holliday.

    And now….The Mash!

    We begin in Detroit, which hosts the Michigan Brewers Guild’s Fall Beer Festival this weekend. It’s a perfect time to read Bill Loomis’s story about the city’s hard-drinking past.

    Not everyone associates “green beer” with St. Patrick’s Day. Roxanne Palmer of the International Business Times updates us about America’s most environmentally-friendly breweries.

    This week’s fun fact: the barley genome is almost twice the size of that of human beings. But a new, high-resolution draft of the genome could someday pay off in the form of higher-quality beer.

    Does that beer you’re drinking taste nasty? Jay Brooks, who judges beer when he’s not writing about it, explains what causes the ten most common off-tastes in beer.

    Actor Will Ferrell, the star of Old Milwaukee beer commercials that ran in cities like Davenport, Iowa, has shot four new–and silly–Old Milwaukee ads that will run in Sweden.

    Ohio’s Winking Lizard beer bars will stop serving Bud Light and Miller Light because it has grown tired of the big breweries’ price hikes. Yuengling Light will replace those brands.

    Finally, Andy Crouch, who has attended the past 16 Great American Beer Festivals, is concerned that the festival is getting too big. He offers a ten-point plan to improve future events.

    The Friday Mash (22-Ounce Bomber Edition)

    Pull up a chair. Pour yourself a beer. A big beer. We’ve got lots to talk about.

    Dr. Fabulous, who blogs at Make Mine Potato, explains how he livens up his tasting notes in an amusing reflection called “Beer Vocabulary.”

    Maxim magazine’s “The Best 25 New Beers in America” met with some biting criticism in the beer blogosphere. Stan Hieronymus rants with style about what’s wrong with Maxim’s list.

    Boak and Bailey, a pair of beer bloggers from England, offer some pub recommendations for Canterbury.

    Here are seven reasons to visit Brewery Ommegang this year. The brewery plans to release a new beer every two months. That makes six. The seventh reason? The Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, of course.

    King me! Draft magazine has a list of the Top Ten Beers Named After Royalty.

    Swedish college students staged a tongue-in-cheek protest over the Carlsberg brewery’s failure to build a 60-plus-mile beer pipeline to their student union.

    Finally, the guys at The Lazy Brewer held an exploratory Amtrak pub crawl from California’s Central Valley to Sacramento. Ah, research.

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