Tennessee

The Friday Mash (Carnegie Hall Edition)

On this day in 1891, Music Hall in New York City—later known as Carnegie Hall—staged its grand opening and first public performance. The guest conductor that day was none other than Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky.

And now (cue up the music)…The Mash!

We begin in Bozeman, Montana, where Amy Henkle’s Happy Dog Beer Company is brewing “beers” for dogs. They don’t contain alcohol or hops; instead they’re a supplement to be poured on top of regular dog food.

Thirty-five years ago, Knoxville hosted a World’s Fair. Several city residents have teamed up to brew a beer celebrating the fair. It will be available through October, when the fair closed.

Sacramento Bee correspondent Blair Anthony Robertson wonders why new breweries price their beer at world-class levels. High prices result in disappointed customers and ruins the brewery’s goodwill.

If you hold bottled beer by its base, you’re holding it wrong. You should hold it by the neck to prevent the beer from getting warm—just as you should hold a wine glass by the stem.

When a Finnish brewery released a 100-pack of its beer, rival brewery Nokian Panimo one-upped it with a 1,000-pack of Kaiseri beer. To buy one, you need 2,160 euros ($2,350)—and a truck.

Researchers in the UK have found that beer is a more effective pain reliever than generic Tylenol. Having three or four beers—resulting in a BAC of .08—reduces pain by up to 25 percent.

Finally, today is Cinco de Mayo. The Chicago Tribune’s Josh Noel prepared for it by drinking Mexican beers in an effort to find out why they’ve become so popular. The answer is a “complex mix of demographics, marketing, history and nostalgia”.

Beer…By the Numbers

  • Federal excise tax on a gallon of beer: 57 cents, or about 5 cents per 12-ounce bottle.
  • Wisconsin excise tax on a gallon of beer: 2 cents (lowest in the nation).
  • Tennessee excise tax on a gallon of beer: $1.29 (highest in the nation).
  • Value of UK beer exports in 2016: $712 million.
  • Increase over 2015: $102 million.
  • Natural Light’s average rating on BeerAdvocate.com (1-to-5 scale): 1.86 (worst of all beers).
  • Budweiser Select 55’s average rating on BeerAdvocate.com: 1.87 (second-worst).
  • Anheuser-Busch InBev’s per-share earnings in fiscal 2016: 72 cents.
  • Decline from fiscal 2015: 86 percent.
  • Canned beer’s share of the market in 2016: 56.2 percent.
  • Its market share in 2008: 50.3 percent.
  • Number of breweries taking part in this year’s edition of SAVOR in Washington, D.C.: 86.
  • States represented by breweries taking part in SAVOR: 31, plus the District of Columbia.
  • Increase in pilsner sales at supermarkets and convenience stores from 2015 to 2016: 56 percent.
  • Increase in craft pilsner sales at supermarkets and convenience stores from 2015 to 2016: 123 percent.
  • Beer…By the Numbers

  • Number of beers ordered by Bristol Motor Speedway for last Saturday’s Tennessee-Virginia Tech game: 545,000.
  • Attendance at that game: 156,990.
  • Ohio’s brewery count: 180.
  • Percent of Ohio breweries that intend to make 12-percent-plus beer now that the ABV cap has been lifted: 10.
  • Increase in 2016 craft beer sales over 2015 sales: 6 percent (compared to 19 percent the year before).
  • Percentage of top-ten craft breweries with lower sales this year than last: 50.
  • Decline in Samuel Adams Boston Lager sales from 2015 to this year: 13.8.
  • Tsingtao Brewery Company’s net income in the first half of 2016: 1.07 billion yuan ($160 million).
  • Change from the first half of 2015: Down 11 percent.
  • Number of tickets Toppling Goliath brewery issued for its Mornin’ Delight imperial stout: 500.
  • Number of people who logged onto Toppling Goliath’s website to buy Mornin’ Delight tickets: 80,000.
  • Average annual salary for assistant brewers at small breweries: $30,000-$40,000.
  • Average annual salary for head brewers at small breweries: $35,000-$47,000.
  • Style categories in this year’s Great American Beer Festival competition: 96.
  • Breweries expected to compete in this year’s GABF: 1,600.
  • Up and Coming Beer Cities

    Not long ago, you had to hop on a plane or take a road trip to find a city that’s rich in good beer. For most people in North America, that’s no longer the case: cities large and small have significantly stepped up their beer game.

    Thrillist.com correspondent Meredith Heil has identified “ten untapped beer cities poised to blow up”. Four of the ten—Birmingham, Durham, Louisville/Lexington, and Memphis—are in the South, craft beer’s last frontier. Birmingham’s presence on the list is especially remarkable; it wasn’t that long ago that homebrewing was illegal in Alabama and archaic laws imposed an ABV cap on beer.

    Salt Lake City is another surprise. Even though Utah eased some of its restrictions on alcohol, serving flights of beer is still a no-no and there’s a 4-percent limit on beer sold in stores. Brewers have to be creative to survive in that environment.

    And we’re happy to see Toronto get a mention. It’s one of our favorite road-trip destinations, and we’ve been partial to Canadian beer ever since we cracked open our first Molson Export Ale. The city is highly walkable, and some of our best memories involve sipping pints on long summer evenings.

    Beer…By the Numbers

  • American movie theaters that serve beer: 200 to 400.
  • Percentage of American movie theaters that serve beer: 3.5 to 7.
  • China’s Snow beer’s share of the world-wide beer market: 5.4 percent.
  • Snow’s world-wide rank in market share: 1st.
  • Number of Chinese breweries in the world-wide Top 10: 4.
  • China’s beer production in 2014: 41.6 million barrels.
  • Decline in production from 2013 to 2014: 2.8 percent.
  • Africa’s beer industry’s compound average growth rate since 2008: 6.6 percent.
  • Asia’s beer industry’s compound average growth rate since 2008: 5.9 percent.
  • Tennessee’s highest-in-the-nation beer tax: $1.29 per gallon ($40 per barrel).
  • Other states with a beer tax higher than $1 per gallon: 3 (Alabama, Alaska, Georgia).
  • Brewery openings in 2014: 615.
  • Brewery closings in 2014: 46.
  • Events at this year’s Albuquerque Beer Week: 170, over an 11-day period.
  • Venues participating in Albuquerque Beer Week: 55.
  • The Friday Mash (P.T. Barnum Edition)

    On this day in 1810, promoter P.T. Barnum was born. He’s best known for founding Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus, but his colorful life story also includes stints as a politician, businessman, reformer, and perpetrator of hoaxes.

    And now….The Mash!

    We begin in Tennessee, where new legislation lessens the tax bite on beer. The old law, which based tax on the price of beer, saddled the Volunteer State with the nation’s steepest tax.

    The staff of FirstWeFeast.com has scoured the country to find unsung cheap beers. The list is dominated by regional beers like Point Special, Iron City, and Genessee Cream Ale.

    The Festival in Portland, Maine, opened late on account of archaic regulations that bar breweries from pouring their own beer. Organizers scrambled to find volunteers for beer-dispensing duty.

    What is it like to ride on the beer train? Scott Rappold of the Colorado Springs Gazette describes his trip on the Rio Grande Scenic Railroad’s annual “Rails to Ales” outing.

    Another television series will have its own beer. Albuquerque’s Marble Brewery will brew Heisenberg’s Dark, an India black ale named for Walter White’s drug-dealing alias in Breaking Bad.

    Hawaii is surrounded by ocean water, and Aloha Brewing Company is using it to brew Gose beer, a style that originated in Goslar, Germany, whose water is naturally salty.

    Finally, a Czech hockey team was forced to leave town because of a dispute over beer. The club played in Budvar Arena, but their league was contractually obligated to serve a competing brand.

    The Friday Mash (D10K Edition)

    Fourteen years ago today, the Dow Jones Industrial Average closed above 10,000 for the first time ever. The milestone prompted a celebration on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, complete with party hats. Probably followed by beers after the market closed.

    And now….The Mash!

    We begin in Chattanooga, whose Beer Board doubled a license suspension for selling to minors because the offending store displayed a sign calling Tennessee’s “card-everyone” law “silly.”

    Stratford, Connecticut’s Two Roads Brewing Company has honored aviation pioneer Igor Sikorsky with a beer called “Igor’s Dream”. Fittingly, it’s a Rye Russian Imperial Stout.

    The Prince Edward Island Liquor Control Commission is looking for a partner for a new beer festival this fall. The commission also intends to ban rival beer festivals on the island.

    Baseball writer (and beer snob) Dayn Perry treated his readers to a Cubs logo made of beer containers that “once housed regrettable North American swill.”

    State lawmakers can’t figure out how the University of Minnesota lost $16,000 on beer sales last football season, even though it sold $900,000 worth of beer at $7.50 a serving.

    Rock star wannabe Adam Dickinson called himself “Hellvis.” His “Hellvis” signature led police to the $30,000 in rare beer he stole from the Avery Brewing Company.

    Finally, Canada produces 80 percent of the world’s maple syrup. Some of it has found its way into Canadian beer. The recommended food pairing? Pancakes.

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